Get Threads magazine!

Subscribe Renew Give a Gift

FIT Exhibit: Japan Fashion Now

h.NAOTO. Gothic Lolita dress ensemble, autumn/winter 2008-09, Japan, museum purchase
h.NAOTO Autumn/Winter 2008.
Number (N)ine. Mans ensemble, autumn/winter 2009, Japan, museum purchase
Japan Fashion Now is a book to coincide with the FIT exhibit.
h.NAOTO. Gothic Lolita dress ensemble, autumn/winter 2008-09, Japan, museum purchase

h.NAOTO. Gothic Lolita dress ensemble, autumn/winter 2008-09, Japan, museum purchase

Photo: Photo by shoichi Aoki; courtesy of FIT

The museum exhibit "Japan Fashion Now" will be shown at The Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York City now through January 8, 2011 in their Special Exhibitions Gallery which is part of the Museum at FIT. Please check the museum's schedules for exact times and dates. Admission is free.

The Japanese fashion revolution of the 1980s dramatically transformed the world of fashion. Avant-garde Japanese designers introduced a radically new fashion concept to the catwalks of Paris. These designers were instrumental in creating a new attitude toward the beauty of imperfection and a new appreciation of avant-garde fashion as "art."

The museum's introductory gallery will set the scene for today's looks by featuring approximately two dozen iconic examples of asymmetrical, "deconstructed" garments by Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons, as well as avant-garde styles by Issey Miyake, who combined innovative textile technologies with aspects of traditional Japanese dress. Both men’s and women’s styles by Matsuda will also be featured, as will "Orientalist" fashions by Kenzo and Hanae Mori, and pop-culture jumpsuits by Kansai Yamamoto. In addition, the main gallery reveals approximately 90 ensembles set within a dramatically-styled space evoking the iconic cityscape of 21st-century Tokyo. 

Contemporary Japanese fashion remains significant globally primarily because it mixes elements of experimental, innovative fashion with aspects of subcultural and street style. Equally significant, however, is the Japanese obsession with perfecting classic utilitarian garments such as jeans, sneakers, and leather jackets. Extreme, even fanatical, attention to detail is characteristic of much of the best Japanese fashion.

In conjunction with this exhibit, Yale University Press  has published a lavishly illustrated book, also called Japan Fashion Now containing 120 color images ($39.94).  If you're not able to make it to the exhibit, the detailed book will be the next best thing.

 

amm April M. Mohr, contributor
Posted on Sep 29th, 2010 in design

Comments (3)

kathis kathis writes: It's apparent that the Japanese designers featured in this sample have been influenced by the "cosplay" phenomenon in Japan. I love to visit the Harajuku station in Tokyo where Japanese young people congregate dressed as their favorite anime or other characters. Great care is given to authenticity in costume and makeup and it's one of the reasons I love Japan!
Posted: 11:43 am on October 7th

kathis kathis writes: It's apparent that the Japanese designers featured in this sample have been influenced by the "cosplay" phenomenon in Japan. I love to visit the Harajuku station in Tokyo where Japanese young people congregate dressed as their favorite anime or other characters. Great care is given to authenticity in costume and makeup and it's one of the reasons I love Japan!
Posted: 11:43 am on October 7th

SeriousSewing SeriousSewing writes: Interesting to see Japanese designers borrowing from their anime culture and cosplay. I love this look. Maybe soon it will be more mainstream and less fringe/weird in the eyes of the general public.
Posted: 7:09 am on September 30th

You must be logged in to post comments. Log in.