How to Make a Hidden Button Placket - Threads


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How to Make a Hidden Button Placket

Photo: Gloria Melfi

A hidden button placket can be used on a variety of garments. It may be placed anywhere on a garment's front, including off-center. Featured in "Fastenings Go Undercover", Threads #168, Susan Khalje shows how to create a perfectly hidden button placket in this tutorial. Don't miss other helpful techniques like this by ordering a subscription of Threads magazine. Print subscriptions come with FREE access to our tablet editions.

The example shown is a button-front shirt pattern with 5⁄8-inch-wide seam allowances. Choose buttons that are smooth and flat so they fasten easily and remain undetectable under the extension.

1. Create a new right front pattern. Tape tissue paper to the pattern front, extending about 6 inches past the pattern's front edge. Trace the center-front line. Measure 5⁄8-inch to the left of center front and draw a vertical topstitching line. Measure 5⁄8-inch to the right of center front and draw a vertical foldline. Then draw three additional foldlines 1-1⁄2 inches to the right of the first, spaced 1-1⁄2 inches apart. Draw a cutting line 5⁄8-inch to the right of the last foldline. Number the foldlines 1 through 4, working toward center front. True the pattern's edges on the tissue. Mark the buttonhole placement 7⁄8-inch to the right of foldline 3.

SusanKhalje

Comments (13)

Amanda133 Amanda133 writes: I read about shirts made in UK that keep shirts from gaping with extra buttons in a hidden placket - I want to mind the gap too

Posted: 7:14 pm on January 31st

heidelat heidelat writes: I was curious as to which jacket patterns were used for the jackets shown in the article...Thank you for a great article.
Posted: 4:55 pm on October 6th

heidelat heidelat writes: Can you tell me what jacket patterns were used for this article? Thank you, Heide L.
Posted: 7:32 am on October 6th

Kayle9 Kayle9 writes: I've used this method for backs of costumes that require lacing, only I put plackets on both sides and use grommets instead of button holes. Tucking in a 4" flap of fabric into the fold on one side allows for the expansion of the costume without having to let it out for the next person.
Posted: 10:49 am on September 26th

yourwildestseams yourwildestseams writes: I used a similar technique for adding pocket flaps to a shirt for an electric company worker. For obvious reasons, they can't have anything that might catch onto wiring, like buttons/buttonholes. Our inspiration was the closure of an army fatigue jacket and they turned out beautifully if I do say so!
Posted: 11:23 am on September 25th

velvetribbon velvetribbon writes: Thank you so much for sharing this with us! I am planning to make a long sleeve blouse for winter. So, I will give a try a hidden button for it.
Posted: 9:44 am on September 25th

velvetribbon velvetribbon writes: Thank you so much for sharing this with us! I am planning to make a long sleeve blouse for winter. So, I will give a try a hidden button for it.
Posted: 9:44 am on September 25th

velvetribbon velvetribbon writes: Thank you so much for sharing this with us! I am planning to make a long sleeve blouse for winter. So, I will give a try a hidden button for it.
Posted: 9:44 am on September 25th

lindacarlson lindacarlson writes: I was ready to take apart a garment with a hidden placket until this issue came out. I used this on two or three lightweight children's jackets I was making for Lutheran World Relief and was very pleased with the results. Really appreciated this article.
Posted: 11:44 pm on September 24th

user-1058697 user-1058697 writes: I have used this technique once for a special machine embroidered blouse for my Mom for Mother's Day. It turned out beautiful. I also loved the pink asian style jacket shown in Threads Magazine #168 with princess style seaming. Would love to know how to create this effect when you have a wide front panel as this jacket did.
Posted: 7:09 pm on September 24th

user-939132 user-939132 writes: My youngest son was passionate about Anime, the Japanese animation films and television programs, and used to go to a yearly festival at Melbourne Uni. This required a costume. One year his friend also asked for a costume, a coat and a shirt with a placket button finish. I was surprised at the detail in the drawings (or rather the lack of detail as this meant less buttons to draw in). I found a blouse with a button placket and copied it. Both costumes went down well that year.
Posted: 6:22 pm on September 24th

user-2657171 user-2657171 writes: I've done several, including a full length coat with regular buttons at the top yoke and hidden buttons the rest of the way down the front. I didn't have enough material to go through all the folding etc. on the right side or any instructions so I simply attached an extra fold of material which I top-stitched onto the lower part of the right front. Worked and looks great.
Posted: 6:15 pm on September 24th

MarjorieT MarjorieT writes: I really like hidden buttons on shirts/blouses, especially when you have a fabric that needs to really show itself off and doesn't need any distraction like buttons. This will be a very handy tutorial to have if I should have the need. Thank-you!!!
Posted: 5:47 pm on September 24th

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