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Understanding Underlining

Underlining can solve a variety of everyday sewing problems.
Underlining can solve a variety of everyday sewing problems.

Underlining can solve a variety of everyday sewing problems.

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Comments (15)

MollieJ MollieJ writes: I always had trouble with my clothes wrinkling. Well, no more with this technique, and this is one of the positive effects.

Posted: 12:57 pm on July 15th

Southernstitch Southernstitch writes: For the turn of cloth, look at the picture on the first page. It shows that the underlining now pushes out from behind the fashion fabric by 1/8 to 1/4 inch after it's draped over the hand. You will baste the sides exactly as you see it when it's draped over your hand, with the fashion fabric just that little bit over the edge of the underlining.
Posted: 11:09 am on August 13th

SueBee8 SueBee8 writes: To NinaC about cool, breatheable linings:
Hi,
I live in hot-in-the-summer Nebraska (today´s forecast high will be 94 deg.). A few weeks ago Hancock Fabrics had their big sale on all their linen. I bought blouse-weight pure (white) linen to use as an underlining or lining for a translucent linen skirt fabric.
Linen, ramie, and maybe hemp (and maybe bamboo?) are the coolest fabrics you can wear in hot weather. A lightweight linen is therefore probably the coolest lining fabric you can get. A caveat: I haven´t actually made the skirt yet, but my linen blouse and shorts are the coolest clothes I own, hence my reasoning. I hope this helps you out.
Cheers and happy sewing!
Posted: 12:14 pm on July 22nd

Maxtork Maxtork writes:
Posted: 1:36 am on February 7th

granolacowgirl granolacowgirl writes: This was great information. Thanks. I have underlined before, but it's been years and this article gave me the confidence to go for it on a beautiful but flimsy fabric.
Posted: 7:28 pm on June 10th

NinaC NinaC writes: I am looking for a cool breathable lining to use for my garments. Any fabric suggestions?
Posted: 7:03 pm on April 14th

Allysonsews Allysonsews writes: Can someone let me know if you would or would not underline a normal-weight wool gabardine for a pair of slacks? I underline most everything with batiste or organza, but I've never underlined a pair of pants and am wondering if it's a useful step? I plan to line them with silk charmeuse. If you would recommend underlining them, would you recommend a light-weight batiste or silk organza?
Posted: 12:24 pm on February 26th

Sewist2010 Sewist2010 writes: I think it's a very interesting, but I, too, am comfused.

Where do you baste? Just inside the seam allowance? How big should the stitches be? Do you shave off 1/8 of an inch to accomodate the turn of the cloth? Where does one do that, exactly?

I went to the fabric link suggested by the author, but the exact product she mentioned doesn't come up if you copy and paste it into the search link for Vogue Fabrics? Which of the batistes does she suggest? Some are $29 a yard.
Posted: 6:42 pm on January 22nd

patty_zoe patty_zoe writes: What should I use to line really, really nice italian wool? I am going to make trousers, perhaps crepe de chine?
Posted: 4:49 pm on October 4th

patty_zoe patty_zoe writes: I bought a really, really nice piece of medium winter weight imported italian wool to make trousers, but what should I use to line? I was going to do the hong kong finish, but I don't think that it will work for slight fit trousers. Help.
Posted: 4:40 pm on October 4th

tessy38 tessy38 writes: This question may be in the wrong area but will try anyway. I have several knit pants and sweatpant that stretch out at the knees, I have read somewhere to sew a lining in the knee area to correct this. Do you know what the procedure would be and what type of lining to use. They are mostly cotton knits.

Thank you,
Theresa
Posted: 9:35 pm on June 16th

tessy38 tessy38 writes: This question may be in the wrong area but will try anyway. I have several knit pants and sweatpant that stretch out at the knees, I have read somewhere to sew a lining in the knee area to correct this. Do you know what the procedure would be and what type of lining to use. They are mostly cotton knits.

Thank you,
Theresa
Posted: 9:34 pm on June 16th

kathlann kathlann writes: This is a wonderful article. I have some very stubborn lightweight tafetta that I am using to make a light coat for a summer wedding. Now I know what I have to do to make it look right.
My understanding of 'turn of cloth' is: Your underlining is meant to be a fraction smaller than your fabric to allow for both layers to sit correctly when you have your seam stitched and pressed open. Hope I got that right!!
Posted: 9:01 am on May 16th

momee momee writes: I still don't understand.
Posted: 6:36 pm on April 21st

AZwanKenobi AZwanKenobi writes: I love this article, but still don't understand how to adjust for the turn of the cloth.....
Posted: 6:07 pm on April 5th

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