Tour the Wolf Dress Form Factory - Threads


Get Threads magazine!

Subscribe Renew Give a Gift

Tour the Wolf Dress Form Factory

Armies of dress forms fill rooms upon rooms of the factory. These forms are awaiting their bases and shoulder plates. Then, they’ll be packaged and shipped off to their respective customers.
Wolf keeps an extensive archive of dressform cover patterns. In fact, there’s a cover pattern for every mold the company owns.
The covers are cut from rolls of linen, and partially stitched by machine. All other sewing is done by hand. The actual forms are made of a multi layered papier-mâché substructure, topped with batting, a cotton knit covering, and then the linen outer covering.
Low tech tools such as broom handles and wooden sticks are just the ticket. Here, Hunton demonstrates the smoothing of the papier-mâché interior.
Rows of plaster casts resemble ancient sculptures. Some of the molds are nearly a century old and are quite heavy.
The forms come in all shapes and sizes, including children’s models. Smaller children’s forms have more prominent bellies and swaybacks, while larger sized forms become more erect and have flatter abdomens.
Men’s jacket forms are lacquered. The shiny surfaces make it easy to slide men’s jackets on and off during fittings.
Armies of dress forms fill rooms upon rooms of the factory. These forms are awaiting their bases and shoulder plates. Then, they’ll be packaged and shipped off to their respective customers.

Armies of dress forms fill rooms upon rooms of the factory. These forms are awaiting their bases and shoulder plates. Then, they’ll be packaged and shipped off to their respective customers.

Photo: Threads Staff

A few months back, the editors of Threads took a field trip out to Englewood, NJ for a sneak peek at how dress forms are created. We featured our findings in Threads Issue 141 in the article “Peek Inside a Dress Form”. Owner and dress form connoisseur Burt Hunton walked us through the amazing process from start to finish. One of the most interesting facts is the entire process is done by hand. In addition to making dress forms, Wolf also repairs and restores forms. For more information please call 201-567-6556 or check them out on the web. Here are a few of the photos and some interesting dress form facts that didn’t make it into the issue.

Find out how you can clone yourself a fitting assistant here.

agfreedm

Comments (5)

DressForm DressForm writes: PGM Dress form is the profession Dress form factory in California since 1983.
PGM Dress form Provide all size of standard dress form and accept Special Size Request.
Contact PGM Dress Form
TOLL FREE : 1-888-818-1991
Addr: 5041 Heintz St. Baldwin Park, CA 91706, U.S.A.
Tel. (626)338-1990; Fax. (626)338-1995
Wesite: http://www.pgmdressform.com

Posted: 5:09 am on July 15th

agfreedm agfreedm writes: Hi Druss,
the stand is created from a metal pole that inserts into a metal base. The base is spring loaded so you can raise and lower your dress form as needed.
Posted: 8:40 am on March 27th

druss druss writes: What do you use for the stand for the dress form?
Posted: 10:50 am on March 26th

druss druss writes: What do you use for the stand for the dress form?
Posted: 10:45 am on March 26th

barbwire1970 barbwire1970 writes: Have always wanted a mannequin and a dress form. Now I see I can actually make one myself for me - a clone..love it, love it, love it.

As an aside to this comment, this site is very creative. I read it from top to bottom, and I don't usually do that just peruse sites, not really in tune with but this site is different, you people are the real thing. Not some copy cat seen it all before site - you truly are original.

What an idea going to mannequin factory. I would have loved to go in person.

LOVE TO YOU, CREATIVELY YOURS,
BARBARA

MY TYPING HAS ISSUES. HA
Posted: 10:50 pm on March 25th

You must be logged in to post comments. Log in.