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CFields

Gainesville, FL, US
member

Member Since: 11/04/2009

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Goodwife Rebecca Towne Nurse 1621-1692

This outfit includes a fully boned set of stays, shift, petticote, mantua, cap and scarf.  It is not exactly authentic for the 1690's since I used a sewing machine, but it's pretty close...


recent comments

Re: Fall 2014 Color Trends Abandon Typical Palette

I love these. Looks like my closet! Most of them are great for redheads.

Re: Video: Sew Perfect Collar Points

To user-2996887,
You might have set you compute to block pop-up windows and this may be why you can't see the videos. Try adjusting your settings.

Re: How to Replace a Sleeve Lining

Nice Salvation Army find! You must live in a fancier-dressed community than I do - ha!. I'm not bothered by the flowered sleeve lining; it's a nice surprise when opening up the coat. I once made a denim tailcoat for a friend who was in the backup band for Joe Walsh. I lined the whole thing with a bright fabric pattered with Maxfield Parrish images and top stitched it in dark yellow like a Levi's jacket. He wore it both onstage and off and it looked great when he flipped the tails up to sit down at the piano.

Re: Dress Forms Can Be a Sewing Room Essential

About 15 years ago I made a polyurethane foam dress form that has held up extremely well. With the help of my husband, I tape-fitted a large plastic bag to cover my torso and neck. We then covered it with gauze-and-plaster bandages used for setting broken bones. (Purchased at a surgical supply store.) They were easy to use - dip in a pan of water for a few seconds and then apply. We applied the strips in a similar way to the duct tape technique, going diagonally from under-bust to shoulder, horizontally around waist and hips, etc. Then let the plaster set. This was the hard part as the plaster gets hot as it sets. I stood in front of a fan! We cut the mold down both sides under the arms using a thin saw. Since it is not flexible, a single cut down the back would have cracked the plaster getting it off. I pulled the plastic bag out of the mold (comes out easily) and filled some of the rough places on the inside with some more plaster to smooth it out. We then duct taped the sides of the mold together, trimmed the bottom and arm openings flat, put cardboard ovals in the arm openings and plywood in the bottom, secured with more tape. Then we mixed up the two-part polyurethane filler and quickly poured it in the neck opening. It expands into the whole form and out the top. After it set, we trimmed off the excess foam with a saw, opened the mold and removed the foam form. It needed a little sanding. We then mounted it on an old music stand base, attaching it to the plywood bottom. The stand is adjustable and is set to my height. I made a cotton/spandex cover for it with center front and back seams that I lined up with the centers of the form and then marked the waistline with fabric marker. I made a pin cushion to mount on top of the neck which covers the raw foam. I can pin into it as the foam holds pins quite well. I gained some weight and all I had to do was remove the cover and pad the form a bit with batting. I can also put a bra on it for further shaping. It's wonderful for fitting; it shows how my shoulders slope (slightly different from each other!), it shows how garments gap at the back of my neck. It's great for pin-fitting patterns as I can pin them right to the form, lining them up with the center lines. It was well worth the effort.

Re: How to Add Mock Cuffs on Short Sleeves

I've done the button bands on the front of shirts this way, too, including a strip of interfacing. I copied this from a ready to wear shirt that I took apart many years ago.

Re: How to Add a Sheer Kick Pleat

I might use this technique but I wouldn't use such a contrasting fabric. I would use a sheer fabric the same color as the skirt so it didn't look like an add-on. I would also make a single pleat pressed to one side instead of a box pleat.

It seems like some attention should be paid to the weight of the pleat fabric. The sheer fabric in these pictures looks like it would sag more than the skirt fabric and end up dragging. I personally don't like the skirt in the example. The pleat looks like it was cut from an old curtain.

Re: More Fortuny! Yes, More!

I have a question about cutting the fabric off-grain. Did you also cut the underlining off-grain to match the outer fabric? I realize they're both lightweight and that the outer fabric won't shift much because of the paint, but I could see where, with wear, you might get a slight twist if there was much difference in grain and a ripple at the hems or seams. Probably depends on the specific fabrics being used - ?

Re: Making a Side Seam Read True

I can certainly see how and why this works. I guess I just have more experience with the "slash and spread" (or fold) technique when altering commercial patterns. The results are similar. As you say, there's more than one way to dress a cat.

Re: Making a Side Seam Read True

I see the logic of this simple adjustment but won't you now have to make a curved, shaped seam and ease the pieces together? Won't be harder to keep the seam flat?

Re: Simple Fixes and Mending Techniques

Good reminder of mending techniques. My grandmother taught me how to darn socks and linens when I was a kid. I've used all of these techniques except the felting. It's a better solution that the one my sister used back in the 1970's to "repair" a badly moth-eaten sweater - she embroidered a flower around each hole. It was cute but no longer warm!

An article showing how to mend and alter knitwear would be useful, too.

Re: How to Sew a Thread Chain

This is a nice little finishing detail, handy for loosely connecting linings that are otherwise free at the hem. To make the chain you can also use a small crochet hook in place of your fingers. The results are the same.
Thanks for the review of these finishing techniques.

Re: How to Attach Hooks, Eyes & Snaps

I know it's frustrasting, but Apple iPads will not play flash videos, the most used video format. This is a major shortcoming of the iPad and due to a failure to come to an agreement between Apple and Adobe.

Re: A Fabulous Fur Handbag

I wasn't too crazy about the jacket made from this "fur" that started out as hair extensions. But the bag is a whole different thing! I think the fur works well as an accessory. As a whole jacket it was a bit much. I love the lacing and macrame half-hitches covering the strap. Very cool.

Re: Slot Buttonholes

The "old fashioned" way to finish up these buttonholes without using the fusible Steam-a-Seam 2 is to invisibly stitch the facing to the outer fabric around the buttonhole by hand.

Re: The Big Finish - Completing the Fantasy Fur Jacket

Fabulous array of techniques and craftsmanship. This should be the picture next to the dictionary entry for Creativity. But OMG, what an ugly garment! LOL It makes me think of Sully in Monsters, Inc. on date night. I loved the series of articles. Thank you, Mr. King.

Re: Drawstring Placement

The title of the article says "drawstring placement" and really only addresses that one issue. It doesn't go into how to actually add a drawstring to a pattern that didn't have one to start with. I have added drawstrings to a few patterns and also readymade garments and each one is a bit different. For placement, you can also put on the garment, tie something around your waist, blouse it up as much as you want and mark where the tie hits the garment with chalk or pins. This is actully more work than measuring and marking the pattern but the only way to go if you are adding a drawstring to an existing garment. And, yes, this will shorten the final length of the garment. The actual casing is usually just top stitched into place.
If you put the casing on the inside, you will have to either cinch and tie it on the inside (hidden when you button the garment) or make openings for the cord ends to emerge. You could also sew the casing on the outside, making it a design feature, and have the cord ends come out on the outside of the garment. You can also run elastic through the casing. Adjust the tightness before you stitch the ends of the elastic at the ends of the casing.
The button to "anchor" the drawstring is there to keep the garment front from gaping under the drawstring when it is cinched to one's waist.
If your garment has no opening (pull over the head) you can still add a drawstring with the cord ends emerging from buttonholes or grommets on the outside. They can emerge at center front, off to the side, center back, etc. - whereever you like. It would help to reinforce the area under the buttonholes or grommets to keep them from raveling out.
It's not so hard, I promise!

Re: Shape a Sleeve with this Easy Fold-Over Placket

I recently used a similar technique on a short sleeved shirt I bought. The sleeves stuck out too far for my taste so I made a tuck, like the one showed here, and sewed a spare button on top to hold it down. Since it is a short sleeved, cotton shirt I just pressed the tuck and didn't edge stitch it or make a buttonhole. Just a Q & D alteration.

Re: Hand Understitching

For Lauriesannie, it appears that the facing shown in the construction photos has been lined with a sheer fabric like organza.

Re: Create a Swirled Bias Sleeve

I think when Sarah says "Twist the pieced fabric to continue the dropped piecing progression." it means to coil the pieced strip into a tube, like wrapping it around your arm, and then pin the long, continuous seam and sew it. It would be like wrapping a ribbon around your arm and seaming the edges together to form a tube.

Re: Sewing with creative materials

What a great technique! I would never have thought to build the backing, row by row, with ribbon. I would have attempted to sew the stips of hair to a solid piece of fabric and I'm sure I would have had trouble with it bunching and puckering. I've made wigs for dolls and have had trouble with this but now I see that the whole back of the doll's head could be made out of the ribbon-and-hair fabric. Very cool. Thanks!

Re: Create a Custom Dress Form

About 15 years ago I made a polyurethane foam dress form that has held up extremely well. With the help of my husband, I tape-fitted a large plastic bag to cover my torso and neck. We then covered it with gauze-and-plaster bandages used for setting broken bones. (Purchased at a surgical supply store.) They were easy to use - dip in a pan of water for a few seconds and then apply. We applied the strips in a similar way to the duct tape described here, going diagonally from under-bust to shoulder, horizontally around waist and hips, etc. Then let the plaster set. This was the hard part as the plaster gets hot as it sets. I stood in front of a fan! We cut the mold down both sides under the arms using a thin saw. Since it is not flexible, a single cut down the back would have cracked the plaster getting it off. I pulled the plastic bag out of the mold (comes out easily) and filled some of the rough places on the inside with some more plaster to smooth it out. We then duct taped the sides of the mold together, trimmed the bottom and arm openings flat, put cardboard ovals in the arm openings and plywood in the bottom, secured with more tape. Then we mixed up the two-part polyurethane filler and quickly poured it in the neck opening. It expands into the whole form and out the top. After it set, we trimmed off the excess foam with a saw, opened the mold and removed the foam form. It needed a little sanding. We then mounted it on an old music stand base, attaching it to the plywood bottom. The stand is adjustable and is set to my height. I made a cotton/spandex cover for it with center front and back seams that I lined up with the centers of the form and then marked the waistline with fabric marker. I made a pin cushion to mount on top of the neck which covers the raw foam. I can pin into it as the foam holds pins quite well. I gained some weight and all I had to do was remove the cover and pad the form a bit with batting. I can also put a bra on it for further shaping. It's wonderful for fitting; it shows how my shoulders slope (slightly different from each other!), it shows how garments gap at the back of my neck. It's great for pin-fitting patterns as I can pin them right to the form, lining them up with the center lines. It was well worth the effort.

Re: The Wackier Words of Sewing and Fashion

The name "sewing bird" comes from the shape of some of the third hand devices made in Victorian times. The holding part was shaped like a bird. It had a clamp that would attach to a table edge with the bird perched on top. You would clip the bird's beak onto your needlework to hold it as the "third hand" leaving your hands free to do the work.

Re: No Ruler, No Problem

I learned from my grandmother to measure yards of fabric by stretching the selvedge edge from my fingertips to my nose - that is one yard. She used it as an estimate but I measured and I actually measure exactly 36" from pinched finger and thumb to my nose.

Re: Enter the Threads Halloween Costume Contest

Thank you, Vicky, for your help posting my photos. Who would have guessed that they were too SMALL! Now they are a little blurry, but not too bad. Thanks.

Cathy

Re: Enter the Threads Halloween Costume Contest

I've been trying to upload my pictures but it keeps telling me that they're too big. But they are much smaller than the limits - 178x352 and only 20KB. They are jpeg images. Am I doing something wrong?

Cathy