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Profile for copperwoman - Threads

copperwoman

Springfield, OR, US
member

My mom sat me down at her Featherweight when I was four years old, and I haven't stopped since. I can't even imagine not being able to sew.

I often made my living sewing, costuming, and pattern drafting. However, it's most important as a creative outlet, and, let's face it, some of the best therapy there is. When everything else is out of control, my 30+ year old Bernina 830 and I can take control of something.

craft interests: embroidery, fashion, quilting, restyle, sewing, costumes, masks

Gender: Female

Birthday: 10/10/1945

Member Since: 08/31/2010

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Couching for the Couch (Oh No! A Pun!)

  Last week at a second-hand store I found these three wonderful pieces of couched, embroidered silk. They were scattered around the store, used as “doilies” under much more ordinary...

That's a Lot of Stripes!

  This is another Day of the Dead costume I made for myself (2004 I think). It’s called a “Pitchy Patchy,’ and it’s my very silly take on a kind of costume worn in...

Restyled Denim Jacket

  As soon as I read Kenneth King’s Kermit Green Jacket (12/14/10) I went out to the thrift store to see if the nearly identical, but tomato red jacket with the same fraying issues was...

Hill Tribe Skirt

  Recently I went to a sale of free trade Hill Tribe (Laos and Cambodia) textiles, art, and silver. I bought a recycled wrap skirt made of two pieces of cloth sewn together, more or less in the...

Day of the Dead Costume

Here I am at a Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration at an art gallery in 2009. My costume started with an old long black dress and a commercially made witch hat. The hat has a...

How I Became "Copperwoman"

Why am I called Copperwoman? I have always really loved the color of copper. In 1996, I was in recovery from a full year of treatment for breast cancer, and was very interested in doing as many of...

Sleeping Under the Stars of African Skies

For many years I had a huge granny-square afghan with black joinings as a bedspread. I really missed it when it gave up the ghost, and tried to figure out a quilt that would have a similar effect. I...

Green Crompton Velveteen

This is another jacket made from the same pattern I used for the red one in “Further Fortuny”. That jacket, although unlined, has a structured look. This one is very soft and...

Further Fortuny

I really enjoyed Kenneth King’s article about making the Fortuny fabric into a shirt.   About 23 years ago, someone gave me several yards of  stunning red silk brocatelle, in a...


recent comments

Re: Video: Use Elastic to Space Buttons

How awkward. I'm with the (so far) majority here. In addition to all the problems noted so far, this actually seems more complicated to me. I use a metric ruler or tape - it makes the arithmetic really easy. I establish the location of the critical buttonhole, and measure from there. I never mark it with pins. Use something such as chalk, or on white or light colors, a tiny dot of water-soluble marker. Put the needle down, and then before beginning to stitch, use a dampened cotton swab to remove the mark. (If you stitch over it, it might be harder to remove and show.) Or use thread markers.

Re: A Trick for Working with Raw Silk

Years ago I made a lot of things from heavy handwoven silk, for a weaver friend. I would pin the pattern securely to the spread-out cloth, then trace all the way around with Fray Check, just outside the cutting line. After it was dry, I would serge it off. Now I would probably use a soluble stabilizer, but Fray check was what was available at the time.

Re: The Work of Weaver Teresa Kennard

Lovely! Is the stencil method that for Okinawan Bingata, or is it something else?

Re: Installing the Front Band to the Fantasy Fur Jacket

Kenneth, ditto sewdizzy and mami50 - your artistry, knowledge, skills, and generosity of spirit are awesome. Thank you. I just bought your beading book and am ready to begin embellishing another thrift store jacket.

Re: BOOK GIVEAWAY: Spacesuit--Fashioning Apollo

Last year, my husband and I traveled to Florida from Oregon in an attempt to see the Discovery launch, but of course it did not happen then - Safety First! We visited the Astronauts' Hall of Fame and everything else available at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral, though. You can be sure I took many, many photos of space suits, and all "accessories" from every angle I could. One display I particularly liked was casts of astronauts' hands, used for making their gloves. Yes, I remember where I was for the moon walk - in my livingroom, waiting eagerly to see it on TV. When Alan Shepherd flew, I heard the broadcast over the public address system in the library of my Junior High School.

Re: Triangle Shirtwaist Fire's 100th Anniversary Commemorated

Thank you for posting this. The efforts obvious in the designs and execution are wonderful and truly honor the memory of those who perished.

Re: What's your current fabric obsession?

I love stripes, too - the ones I love most are of the handwoven or hand printed ethnic variety. I was delighted to see that one of your fabrics came from Hart's in Santa Cruz, CA. I worked there decades ago! Every time I visit SC, I make sure I go to Hart's. Last November I bought a selection of oddball upholstery remnants there - one is a stripe! Another great source if you're visiting SC is an ethnic arts and textiles gallery called Rivendell. Santa Cruzans tend to travel, and many, including me, have been bringing back textiles to owner Patricia Moore for decades. I bought a Kimono in a gorgeous woven red and green stripe, a piece of shibori, and an all-black silk sari with a gold stripe running along one edge.(I used to work there, too.)
Carol Plaia (Copperwoman)

Re: What fabric do you love to sew with most?

Pashmina is a fiber, not a fabric. It comes specifically from Pashmina goats. Originally, only wool from Cashmere goats could be called Cashmere. I believe in current terminoloy, wool from Pashmina goats and a couple of others may be called Cashmere, but only that from Pashmina goats may legally be called Pashmina.

That said, recently I saw some really tacky rayon and acetate scarves for sale at a store, that were labeled Pashmina as a brand name!

Re: Suggest a Designer for the Spotlight

Zandra Rhodes.

Re: What are Your Favorite Embroidery Software Features?

Whoops! I meant to post that on April Mohr's article, and I couldn't figure out how to delete it from here.

Re: Book Giveaway: "Embroidery Companion: Classic Designs for Modern Living" by Alicia Paulson

My mother taught me to sew, but it was grandmothers Ida and Georgia who were in charge of embroidery. As my cousin commented about grandma Georgia, “Grandma’s embroidery is reversible.” It was true. Her standards seemed impossible. I loved to read from an early age, and spent a lot of time at the library, where I often would look at art books where beautiful tapestries were described as being embroidered with “polychrome thread.” I would think, “Gee, if only I could get some of that polychrome thread, maybe I’d be able to embroider as well as Grandma.” It wasn’t until I was about eleven that I realized I already had some – it just meant multi-colored. Polychrome embroidery(I’m afraid mine is not reversible)challenges and delights me to this day.

P.S. I accidentally posted this on Sarah McFarland's article about machine embroidery, and couldn't figure out how to delete it.

Re: What are Your Favorite Embroidery Software Features?

My mother taught me to sew, but it was grandmothers Ida and Georgia who were in charge of embroidery. As my cousin commented about grandma Georgia, “Grandma’s embroidery is reversible.” It was true. Her standards seemed impossible. I loved to read from an early age, and spent a lot of time at the library, where I often would look at art books where beautiful tapestries were described as being embroidered with “polychrome thread.” I would think, “Gee, if only I could get some of that polychrome thread, maybe I’d be able to embroider as well as Grandma.” It wasn’t until I was about eleven that I realized I already had some – it just meant multi-colored. Polychrome embroidery(I’m afraid mine is not reversible)challenges and delights me to this day.

Re: What's your state garment?

A perhaps too obvious choice for Oregon:
A dress with a skirt made of successive layers of umbrellas -maybe with alternate layers of tye-dye and Pendleton plaid.

Re: Sleeping Under the Stars of African Skies

Posewing: Thank you!

A "burn test" will allow you to identify pretty accurately what the content of a fabric or thread is. Just Google "facric burn test" and ou'll find lots of them. Ditto for what needles to use, etc. Of course, over the years, Threads has answered these questions and many more, sometimes more than once!

Copperwoman

Re: Sleeping Under the Stars of African Skies

Thank you, Posewing!

Copperwoman

Re: The Kermit-Green Jacket

Wow, Kenneth! You've done it again! I'm going back to the thrift store right away to see if the basket-weave tomato red jacket is still there for $3.00. It has just the same problem, but additionally the style is too conservative for me. If I do this, and change the buttons, it will probably be "done" and perfect. If it's still there, I'll post it when done. I have on hand another thrift store jacket that is brand new gorgeous purple wool. I plan to bead and embroider or whatever on it, perhaps after altering it a bit. Thank you,long-lost Thrift Store/Save-It Sibling. Luckily, we are a very large and growing family, and know how to share.

Re: Green Crompton Velveteen

Oh, GinnyLynn, you are so correct! This velveteen is about as soft as fabric can get. Thank you for the compliments.

Re: Further Fortuny

Thank you, ladysewsew and Stitichy! Your lovely, immediate comments have inspired me to share more. I think I'll send my one-and-only quilt next.