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rkr4cds1


member

Member Since: 03/09/2009


recent comments

Re: Kenneth D. King's Kilim Carpet Coat: The Big Finish

Mr King - I'm so pleased to read this final installment - a brilliant finish to a garment of unique materials. I'm the admirer-of-your-work who met you @ MDWY last Sunday and introduced myself: I recognized you by your stunning hair (I'm a cosmetologist...) and the jacket you were wearing. As I shook your hand I managed to touch the cuff cloth w/one finger—just because I couldn't resist. Sorry if that sounds stalker-ish!

I said that I'd commented in this column (almost 2 years ago-Mar '12) on your great/intentional, non-abstract patterning of jeans slashing. I'm pleased to see how well slashed jeans looks with this coat, too.
Thx again for being so gracious to a #1 fan!

Re: An Interesting Embellishment Technique

'That' - - is MACHINE sewn?? Excuse me, but all I see is a hand-sewn running st. What part is the machined work... Perhaps in gray to match the background?

Re: How to Add Mock Cuffs on Short Sleeves

This is a classic way to shorten a pair of long pants into anything from capris to walking shorts as well, and you already have plenty of material there to work with, at any length. Gives a very nice easy, finish to the hemline.
THX for reminding us!

Re: How to Add Mock Cuffs on Short Sleeves

This is a classic way to shorten a pair of long pants into anything from capris to walking shorts as well, and you already have plenty of material there to work with, at any length. Gives a very nice easy, finish to the hemline.
THX for reminding us!

Re: How to Sew Inseams

I wish the demo fabric had been in a color rather than in natural muslin (or in 2 different shades); even a denim which is shaded differently on the inside and outsides.
It is really difficult to see the Front and Back pieces separate from each other in these images.
Thx for the explanation however.

Re: Project Runway All Stars, Episode 9: "There's No Business Like Sew Business"

I so agree with the previous 3 posts: we are one day short of Episide 11 and you haven't posted Episode 10 yet. This tardiness is so very unusual that I keep feeling that I'm out-of-step and it's me who's missed one of your columns, instead of the other way around.
What's happening with the PR All -Stars version?
And the images are giving us no detail (shot from too far away with no cropping of the photos); even though I have watched the show, for those who aren't able to receive the show on their TV broadcasts, they look to this column to 'see' the garments. These images show nothing of the details you're describing.
Finally, Ivy is nothing but Ms. Excuses. Her final garment was a muu muu. She counted on the patterning in the fabric to carry her through and "didn't want to cut into it's beautiful artistic placement." It wasn't just the shortening; she didn't want to cut into it at all.
With those elements in the fabric, even I know any number of effects I'd've used to design and create a beautiful dress or summer suit with that fabric!

Re: Project Runway Episode 6: "Fix My Friend!"


WickeOd_stitcher: (Dmitry) On some levels the designer should know bodies well enough to know what will not only FIT but FLATTER!
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Agreed!! She looked very sausage-like! RIDICUOUS! You could see every muscle group in her body and her underwear. Clothes (especially a sheath like that) are supposed to skim the body, and hang from the shoulder seam and the waistline or other touch-points.


416: but he must learn that all clients do not have an hourglass figure.
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No, and after all of these decades, today's runway clothes are still designed for 'Twiggy'. I don't know when this IDEAL is going to leave us. As our nation and the rest of the world gets fatter, the designers continue to design these unrealistic shapes, setting everyone up for a depression/failure.



Flanerie & user-261446: Has Ven looked in a mirror lately? He's not exactly reed-thin himself.
Ven's figure is at least on a par with his client's but I bet he doesn't think there's anything wrong with his measurements.
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Thank you Ladies! I didn't want to be the first to point this out, but Ven himself is the only over-sized person currently on the show; how can he be so blindly prejudiced? He certainly doesn't purchase his clothing in any off-the-rack shop, as he doesn't even fit men's standards at the Gap®: he's a Big & Tall himself. NO EMPATHY!!! I had my money on him from the start with the fantastic design work he accomplished out-of-the gate. Perfection in tailoring and finishing. And he did most of it in silence. But this week he hardly closed his mouth, though editing can probably be fingered for the amount of grumbling we saw & heard from him. We know that drama is what keeps 'the number ratings' up and advertisers need those.


acatalina2: The blouse appears to be the bodice side of a salon robe...
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Exactly. It appeared that he removed (a bit) of the fullness in the gathers between the workroom and the runway but 3/4 of the rest could have also gone and still given the same effect, yet minimized her assets! And to add insult-to-injury, Ven put on hugely flaring butterfly sleeves, ending again at her waistline, which again added bulk across the top, could have had the same effect with 1/3 the amount of material, really had no design purpose linked to the bodice and showed none of the design talent for which he's been known. A salon-style robe WOULD have been more flattering; it would have looked like a Diane von Furstenburg Wrap-style dress on his model!

And my personal pet peeve: I'm forever bothered by the lazy lazy method of applying all of the zippers onto the outside of garments!! It's not a design element, as in Ven's skirt, but just the ordinary garment zippers. With the sausage-fitting garments, they have dips and waves in them like roller coasters, yet the competitors are never called out for it by the judges. They should use a point system and receive Technical Demerits!
If they must, do they have to use metal-toothed ones which catch the light reflection on the runway? They certainly must have the nylon-spiral/toothed style available in the workroom, which can be inserted in the 'invisible seam' method. It would take less time to do it the right way than try to get one on the outside to be lined up straight!
Stepping down from my soapbox for the day....

Re: The Results Are In! Do Horizontal Stripes Affect the Way You Look?

I totally disagree with the 'blanket statement' about the conclusions made for all persons perceptions about the black vs. white and stripes: a least to my eye that the black rectangle surrounded by all of the white appears larger due to the amount of white:
I find quite the opposite to be true. The black in the right-side of the image appears to shrink or push in on the white rectangle, exactly as you were unintendedly describing with your same principle ".. the black surrounding the white makes it [the white] appear smaller..")
With the background being white in the left-hand image, the black rectangle appears to swell and appear larger.
I've just had a complete eye exam last week (empty wallet now!!) and I'm just calling this a case of 'The Emporer's New Clothes'.. aka - my opinion only.

As to stripes, in this stark design especially, once you can actually count the number of stripes across the body and compare it to a horizontal stripe design, I've always felt that there is a definite impression of more width in the vertical stripe!! Perhaps if the effect was softened with a different style of stripe it mightn't be so obvious..?

Re: An Exquisite Beaded Embroidery Sleeve

That is my question too... is it Middle Eastern?
An elaborate costume or celebration dress?

Re: How to Sew a Bound Buttonhole

As eatsallinsects commented, I too was taught that the shape that the 'lips' of the bounding can take any shape at all, from these straight strips through sail boats, crescents, cat faces and anything you can imagine.
The principle remains the same.
As to finishing the inside, elenaevent, I was taught to line the garments, with a hand-stitched cut-away very neatly fitting closely around the buttonhole.
They're very elegant and people never fail to comment on these OOAK buttonholes!

Re: A Fix for a Baggy Seat

Just found this old thread - I hope someone has an answer!
I have always had this problem; I'm an XL to 1X but carry my weight more in my hips than in my derrière.
No matter what size/weight I am, I always put the small darts over my hips rather than the standard position and my slacks and pants always hang straight on the grain and properly hang from the waistband.
But I ALWAYS get long sweeping curved diagonal wrinkles which form from the center of my derrière, down through the inseam and pointing toward the knees. I've adjust the depth of the curve of the front and back crotch seams separately until they both barely skim the body while walking and standing but after sitting in my pants, these annoying wrinkles form!
Help, please!!

Re: Slashing Just for Fun

Whether one likes the idea of the diagonal slits or not, I'd like to address another feature I just noticed.
This doesn't show up well in your photographs - of the finished jeans you're wearing or of the punch-process: did you really leave the right leg below the knee untouched, having the slits sort of trail off like they do in the photos?

Now THAT'S interesting and definitely artistic. I love abstract, done on the diagonal, as the last row of the pattern appears to be and the juxtapositioning of the regular placement of slits over the rest of the jeans and then the untouched lower right pant leg is very unexpected.
Definitely showing purpose and custom-design.
Well-done!

Re: Slashing Just for Fun

I read everyone's comments this time, before viewing the 3 pages of Images. Therefore I wasn't quite sure what the end result would look like; I expected huge gaping holes from some of the reviews.
I was very pleasantly surprised to find a wonderfully subdued pattern of small diagonal 'furries' all over Kenneth's jeans! And as the edges of the slits have bloomed, they have actually filled in any area that one might expect to see any skin through.
Had these slits been cut straight across the grain the slits would more definitively gaped open when the body underneath bent or leaned over, though again the fuzzy edges camouflage most of this when upright.

This is pure physics—and Kenneth knew exactly what he was doing by cutting them on the diagonal, which is why HE'S the designer and we're the readers!

A few years ago, after back surgery, I needed to recover a sofa in the family room; I did it in a light blue denim which has a very slight slub and 'thread line' running through it.
Instead of the laborious regular seaming techniques in upholstering, especially not being able to handle stiff, heavy fabric under the needle, I had the sofa/couch put up on saw horses and fit the fabric pieces right on the furniture itself.
After cutting and pinning the fabric sections together, I used a similar thought process as Kenneth's—use the denim's ability to bloom to my advantage. The seam allowances were left on the outside/front side of the covering, and after machine washing and drying a few times, I have a great new light blue denim covered sofa, with half-inch long, rounded, soft white 'bloom' outlining all of the detail seam lines.
Thx for your inspiration, Kenneth! I think I'll try this, with slightly shorter diagonal lines on some twill sale fabric in my stash. This almost looks like a tile or quilt pattern

Re: Creating a Minifacing

Surely this isn't 'finished' yet..? And there will be another lining or something which will cover all of this messy stitching up??
I have a personal thing about making-it-look-as-good-on-the-inside-as-it-does-on-the-outside and even the catch-stitching here looks like a beginner's attempt.
Nice technique but I'd be ashamed to have this photographed.....
At least suggest pushing the loose corner edges of the organza up underneath the underlining so they're not hanging loose—I can see this tenuous 'patch' shifting or being torn off with the first time this nice slim, basic sheath dress is pulled on and off (besides the crisp material being scratchy against the skin)—or tell us what else is going to be done with this garment's insides, please.

Re: Project Runway 9: "Finale - Part 2"

I've just watched the first half of the After-Show: Tim Gunn/ Between The Seams program, taped tonight. He had a awful lot say about the unprecedented amount of glue used this year and sewing the models into the garments: apparently neither will be allowed next year. FINALLY!!!!
I'll watch the rest tomorrow; finger crossed that Tim has more Good News like this for next season - it may call me back!

Now if only they could get a bit more sewing (techniques/methods) shown and a few less-catty, hypocritical judges...
And I would still be interested in a face-off of all nine Seasons' winners, promised for 2012.

Re: Project Runway 9: "Finale - Part 2"

I only started watching 3 or 4 years ago. Seth Aaron - I miss you!!!

And this is the first year that I began to read the results here first before I watched the show; for some reason that made it more palatable...

Right up til the last moment I hoped even Josh would take it from the inevitable one-note Anya but it wasn't to be.

I'll find something else to fill the 4th time slot on my recording schedule the next season that PR is on, for ALL of the reason given so eloquently by those before me. And I've had enough of the host, Heidi, caving to the bullies.

Re: Project Runway 9: "All About Nina"

Puckers! Wrinkles! Sloppy drag lines!
All of the clothes are just being made too tightly! Burt's, Viktor's and Julie's were the only ones this week which appeared to actually fit the model who was wearing them; again the rest look like Alice after she tested the 'Drink Me' bottle and began to grow.

Why is it the current fashion to wear skin-tight clothing everywhere? SOME clothes are designed that way due to the type of cloth involved and the design, but not all. The rest are just hideous because the lines are ruined by seeing all of the wrinkles across the body as the clothing hangs up on every part of the models's already slim build.
Really look at the designs each week: not for the color or cutting/seam lines or your favorite designer but just to observe whether or not each garment is skimming the body and hangs beautifully while the model moves or if it looks to be spray-painted on. No - wait, I rescind that - spray painting would be a positive, as there would be no wrinkles and puckering in that!!

It's no wonder then that the average consumer thinks that this is the way in which clothing should be worn and purchases everything 2 sizes too small.
It's not comfortable to be constantly tugging at one's clothing to resettle it as you're walking, sitting down, standing up, climbing stairs, etc.

Call me old-fashioned but there's still something to be said for "Mystery lends Enchantment!'

Re: Sewing with creative materials

I'm curious about all of the puckers in the weft ribbon. I assume you held the ribbon and weave smoothly taut as they passed under the presser foot; but why so many puckers? No way to avoid those after all of your experience on your second coat?
As a cosmetologist I do have a theatrical application I could use this for, but am afraid that those would become scratchy or bumpy against the head....especially balding males.

Re: Sewing the Facing Gusset for the Fantasy Fur Jacket

Oops sorry - this got posted into the wrong 'thread'!
I'm not sure I have an Edit or Delete option....

Re: Sewing the Facing Gusset for the Fantasy Fur Jacket

I'm curious about all of the puckers in the weft ribbon. I assume you held the ribbon and weave smoothly taut as they passed under the presser foot; but why so many puckers? No way to avoid those after all of your experience on your second coat?
As a cosmetologist I do have a theatrical application I could use this for, but am afraid that those would become scratchy or bumpy against the head....especially balding males.

Re: Who influenced or taught you the most when you started sewing?

Thank You,mostly Mom - and Grandma. As the older daughter of two, with 5 brothers on both sides of us, Mom sewed just about everything but our underwear from before the time I was born during WW2 through the late 50s. She even made a suit or 2 for Dad, complete with the 'proper bespoke' elements. She could do anything.
Once every year or so, Grandma stayed for a week or two and helped with the annual batch of PJs and whatever else needed sewing, separately from babysitting while another sibling was being added to the growing family of 7 kids. They even sewed or knit or quilted the hot pads used for cooking and canning the countless quarts of food that we consumed during the winter, not down-on-the-farm, but in suburban Chicago.
I still sew—personally and in my business, as they taught me - "It has to look as good on the inside as it does on the outside!"

Re: What's in Vogue

On the contrary, individuals who are carrying extra pounds cannot *hide* them under the seemingly shapeless garments like these (jackets.) It only makes the weight more obvious. These were designed for slim people, to make them look appear to look chic.
Have you never noticed how wrinkled linen (its natural state after being worn for a few hours on a hot summer day) on a slim person still looks elegant, but on a heavier person, looks as if we've been put into a potato sack? It's the same principle.
To be at one's best it's important to know how to choose clothing designs that SKIM THE BODY and hang from the shoulders or the waist, not snagging and hanging up on the hips/bust/upper arms/thighs/etc.
Everyone is wearing their clothes too tightly today!!!

And where have waistlines gone? If you look at images of women in entertainment/news/media/in-the-public-eye they are wearing the *bandage-style* dress, which tightly wraps the body and the smallest part of the waist appears to be just under the bust where the line slopes down in a gradual curve to the hips.
This gives a look of continuous *party-time/on-the-prowl*. Why don't they or their personal assistants and stylists know how to advise them on appropriate looks for different occasions and time of the day or night? Spanx® must be their only hope of carrying this off, because it gives them all a uniform look.

My hope for the newest PR season is that we see a return to some designers who know how to finish seams, not have everything fit with negative ease and will create pieces (skirts) longer than they are wide! More CLASS & CLASSICS behind the modern designing, please!

Re: Custom Pants Pattern Workshops at Your Request

I would pay ANYTHING to be rid of the wrinkles that form in every pair of pants I sew, which form from mid-derrière, run diagonally down and around under the crotch toward the front of my thighs and crotch and end in the front section of every pair, no matter how slim or loose the pants/slacks are—and they all hang from the waistband, too!

No book, class or sewing teacher has ever been able to correct this, give it a name or even explain why they form or give fitting/drafting/cutting instructions on how to eliminate these in the drafting process.

I HATE them as they absolutely ruin the look of some slacks, depending on the fabric content.
Any takers in Metro Chicago/North-Eastern Illinois?

Re: A New Improved Seam Roll

>>>Hmmm... I wonder how we can make a curved seam roll for sleeves??<<<
Somehow I deleted my first comment - - oops!!

There are curved sections for stair hand railings in a multiple range of configurations of degrees of curves and angles.
Check out your DIY shops for one that suits your sewing needs.

Re: A New Improved Seam Roll

>>>Hmmm... I wonder how we can make a curved seam roll for sleeves??>>Kenneth love this seam roll - how many layers of muslin are used? I'm thinking it needs to have more padding than just a single layer of fabric.<<<
There is a fuzzy-napped fabric with a reflective fabric on one side, used for making replacement ironing boards covers, approximately 1/2" thick. I think that would be excellent backing underneath - and I've got all 3 components here right now. THX!!!

Re: A Nice Little Suit

Also, a comment on the skirt buttonholes - running vertically.
The use of a keyhole-style is not going to save the fact that the buttons are more likely to pop out of the holes with the strain of sitting in this skirt.
I'm wondering why they weren't stitched horizontally?

The images are also confusing—are there actually two sets of buttons & buttonholes involving the placket? On the last page of images, the buttonholes appear to be on a right-hand side of the skirt and then on a left-hand side...

Re: A Nice Little Suit

The skirt & jacket look as if they came from two entirely different suits: different moods, different occasions to wear. The only thing coordinating them is their fabric.
I agree with 'ipodgrannie': Are those ruffles frayed? Are we the only ones who've noticed the loose threads all over the riffles & bows??

After all of the couture work in the jacket, could that awful mess of a ruffled, bow-filled placket down the front of the skirt (which doesn't even match its own 'safari' theme) really have simple torn/fraying edges??
Even 30 years ago we knew how to pull out a few more warp threads to keep those future messies from happening.
This skirt is wrong for this jacket on so many levels...

Re: Australian Woolgrowers Dress Prince William

amm - You are truly a strong woman!
I have a little note facing me on my bulletin board above my computer - for just this purpose in my own writings:
ADMIT to mistakes.
APOLOGIZE.
ASK what will make it right.
I use these 3 A-s in business all of the time and they're a wonderful tool for Customer Service, when necessary!
I didn't mean to stomp all over your article; it's articulate and informative as well as entertaining! We're all a bit curious and interested this week anyway.
I love the breed/fiber information and soak it up wherever I can find it.
Thank you again for being so gracious in the face of my rather abrupt critique: I didn't mean it to sound as harsh as it reads in black & white!
I'm 'Admitting, Asking and hoping you'll Accept my APOLGY'!!!!

Re: Australian Woolgrowers Dress Prince William

"A particular type of sheep--a marino sheep--produces marino wool."

Sorry-it's the Grammar Police here-I hope you quickly correct the horrible mistake of misspelling the breed of sheep in the Subject title under the image at the top of this topic!

Re: Are You In or Out? "Project Runway" is Casting Season 9

I have definitely missed a season-without-PR!
There was tension last season but also way TOO MUCH IMMATURITY on the part of some of the contestants.
Are we seeing what's left at the 'bottom of the barrel'?
Surely there are still more eager new designers out here who are worthy of this shot at their big opportunity, who also have the levelheadedness to control their emotions and keep their minds on what they're there for??
It's a pressure-cooker for sure, but so are the internships in many career fields.
Let's see a little more professionalism and quality sewing; sometimes I think that my grandchildren could have basted some of those seams together better than some of the hems and finishes we saw last year....

Re: The Felted Wool Sweater--Updated

LOL - I'm almost sorry I clamored for Part 2 (a complete image) now!
Somehow the two don't quite match; it was better to keep wondering - - - - -

Now that we've been exposed to the inside working of many designers' minds through PR & The Ultimate Collection, there is something that's 'off' for me, and it's the dichotomy between the fine quality of the detailed finishing and the rough-and-tumble, hunters' camouflage print in a thick, casual, fuzzy fabric.

Either one would have been fine by itself: boxy-shaped pullover out for a stroll in the woods or the nicly detailed shoulder treatment on a casual bateau sweater a la 1950s—but to me it looks like a jumble that just tried to accomplish too much.
Or this is the practice (non-muslin)piece and I'm waiting to see it worked up in The Fashion Fabric!

Re: The Felted Wool Sweater--Updated

Ditto SilksWithAttitude! I know that Kenneth was teaching a Technique rather than a Pattern, but seeing this sweater in total would certainly affect how one would relish a new project!
How did the front collar and lapels lay?
Did it even have these features?
Were there closures along the front and how were they handled?
Were the side seams tapered for the body silhouette to eliminate bulk?
So many questions and all needing answers.... can there possibly be a Part 2?

Re: Keep These Seam Finishes in Your Bag of Tricks

For the first time, I'm disappointed in the follow-through of a Topic lead-in.
After showing the example of a reversible hem in the 'teaser', I was expecting some brilliant new ideas along the lines of David's shirt techniques.
While these are all good basic techniques that everyone should learn, and realizing that there will always be newcomers eager to expand their skills, had they been identified more clearly as such—BASIC Uses of Pinking & Zig-Zag—in the subject title, I wouldn't be so disappointed.
Please give us more advanced, NEW finishing ideas next time, for inspiration??
Thank You!

Re: Project Runway: We're in a New York State of Mind

I truly think that Gretchen has been especially saved to be the very last person to be 'taken down' by the Challenges, just BECAUSE she has been the loudest, most vociferous, Big Mouth we've seen in ages!
April wouldn't have been as fitting a climax to the eliminations as Gretchen will be this Thursday!
As they are already sewing for sizes 0 and 2, why was it necessary for Gretchen's skirt to form so many wide & deep wrinkles across both the front and back of that skirt???? Why must everything be too too skin-tight?
Andy's & Mondo's were very body-skimming without binding. Gretchen will go, then Michael; it will be Andy & Mondo, the most creative designers and the two with the best technical sewing skills at Fashion Week.
As for the tape - there were shiny strips showing all along the edges of a red-haired model's bodice about 3 or 4 seasons ago, with very little flak.
It's been done before and will be done again... unfortunately... who's to say...???.... we weren't there?

Re: Project Runway: There's a Pattern Here

Did I miss 'class' when this announcement was made - or does everyone else understand this except me?

- No Model-talk this year? When was that decided to be cut out, though I also appreciate that cattiness being cut, there's too much of it among the designers.

- When was it decided to mic the designers while their designs cat-walked? Their self-promoting comments are atrocious to hear - so self-serving!!
And do they need to put their words on-screen,too? As if we can't already hear them loud enough?

- The hair and make-up are just awful this year; are there too few cosmetologists and make-up artists or given too little time? Example: many of the models last just had messy pony tails or stringy looking hair, as if they'd done their own, and nothing outstanding in make-up. I don't see anything 'Special' here at all any more'!!

-I agree about the cattiness of the judges - NO constructive Criticism being given, not that they should need to at this level of designer professionalism. What help is that? - out-of-presence laughing about the personalities of the designers is about as mean-spirited as what the designers have been doing: don't they realize that it will be viewed by those same designers?
How disheartening for them - - and courageous to face the judges again a few days later.

And most of the comments about the designers below are 100% valid as well.

This is the weirdest year yet - have they run out of a pool of sewers or design ideas? I'm so tired of bias-draped (lazy) swathes being called necklines or those horrendous armscyes that Gretchen sewed (?) last week .....

Bring back Seth Aaron's type of work! - even Irina vs Carol Ann vs Althea - now those designers could sew AND design!!!

Re: Decorative pockets or bound buttonholes

Ahh - Couture Tailoring 101!!
And the real beauty of this technique is that the shape of the window openings can mimic the theme of the clothing; they can be perfectly round circles, diamond shapes, crescents or any shape you can imagine.
The set-in panel of the two-sewn-together pieces for the buttonhole 'lips' remains the same, just the 'window' shapes change and is emphasized or played down depending on whether you use contrasting colors or the same fabric for the lips.
Also Love it!

Re: Choose the Winner in the Fancy Fabric Contest

I wish all of that gathered tulle cape weren't covering up the bodice of the fuschia dress...the fitted skirt and fish-tail flounce are the only things to judge it on. It looks as though there's a bow detail across the bustline, and the bottom of the skirt has a few layers of fuschia fabric unattractively looped around that area - or it could just be the pose - - or the photography...
We just cannot see the detail in that dress well enough to compare it to the rest of the pieces.

Re: How to Cover Snaps for that Touch of Couture

In fact, I'm even more convinced of the direction of my comments when I view the very first sentences in this article:
[Sometimes the word “couture” implies difficult and time consuming.
But it really stands for quality workmanship..."]

This column is definitely not for Sewing 101.
We can get that on too many other sites.
I expect Threads to offer us TOP QUALITY Couture, for today's busy woman.
I was a subscriber from the very first issue in the 80s when I was a working woman.
Now that I have changed professions and am a Fiber Artist/Sole Proprietor of my own business, I value individual, hand's on QUALITY work even more.

Re: How to Cover Snaps for that Touch of Couture

As I began this Comments section, I'd like to clarify something, though my statements certainly are stand-alone ones and ones which MaryRay and others appear to have understood.

They were made with respect as I would to any other professional; as I treat all individuals respectfully and appreciatively because we all have different points of view depending on our background and/or experience.

What I was referring to was the appearance of the loose threads laying alongside the snap's ball in image #2.

The easily-frayed cut edges of this particular material is in evidence in the last image as well, which lead me to think that a spreading of the warp and weft would serve the purpose better than cutting them.

Or, alternatively, if cutting is a must, then to suggest overcasting the cut edges with a fine thread, as I would worry about future unraveling at that spot in a garment that I was to wear, at the same time elevating it into the realm of Hand-Made rather than Home-Made.

To me, anything that can be done as a preventative rather than as a later 'fix', is far better. Once threads begin to fray out of a close-set area like this it's almost impossible to put them back into their original positions.

My comments were directed toward - - '...an ounce of Prevention..."

It's perhaps a mountain out of a molehill, but isn't it "all in the details"?

And I am somewhat tongue-in-cheek, as I take all sewing and needlework seriously but don't wish to upset anyone here by posting.
Please forgive me if this is toe-stepping!!!


Re: How to Cover Snaps for that Touch of Couture

I'm really having a problem understanding why a couture column would advocate 'cutting' a spot open for the snap...
This is a guaranteed weak spot (quickly fraying out) and it will positively scream Home-made!
I've used this technique successfully many times with many weights of fabric; an awl will gently spread the threads apart to push the ball through and on the female side, very short sts around the circle will hold the warp and weft threads back out of the way.
Please don't talk down to us and take the easy, kindergarten way out.
We look to Threads for short cuts, but also for QUALITY!

Re: What's Your Favorite Non-standard Sewing Machine Foot?

My workhorse, a 40+ year old Viking & I like best to use a little 'tank' too. It's a Roller Foot with 4 rollers on it, but the rollers are cross-hatched, unlike the smooth surfaced one the show now as a Leather Foot.
It rides over everything with perfect ease; silk gauze and heavy denim.

Of course, being a complete Tool Gal, I have all of the other feet & accessories, but I rarely remember to switch the feet.
The buttonhole foot would have helped me just today, in fact...

Speaking of being fiddly, I've always wished that they'd made the screw that holds the feet in just a few turns longer. I can 'almost' get most of the feet changed without the screw coming out of the hole but it usually pops out and it's a bit of an inconvenience to try to thread it back in - backwards - and with the left hand.
The person designing that system didn't think that through very well!

Re: How do you bear it?

Sorry, the URSA link won't wrap correctly and open.
This 'TinyUrl!' is good for 30 days; the competition closes 10 September; there's more than enough to time to use it!!

http://tinyurl.com/ktseyy

Re: How do you bear it?

I'm a Fiber/Textile Artist, specializing in Miniature Teddy Bears since 1990, and you've finally hit the subject that's in my back yard!
First, World of Miniatures is not considered Artist bears by those in the field: they are manufactured bears, made individually with production techniques by workers in Asia. The company owners now live here in the US.

'Artist' teddy bears—standard larger bears—were only developed in the 80s by the van Port family in the Northwest. It is a relatively young Collectors' market.
Artist bears are OOAK (One Of A Kind) or made one at a time in VERY small, limited series (usually less than 5 or 10.) My work was also 2" to 3" tall, sewn 20 sts to the inch, vintage long pile, either Malden Mills' or similar fabric, turned right-side out, stuffed, extensively needle- and scissor-sculpted, shaded by hand. This is labor intensive work and one 2" teddy may take well over one week to design and create: accessories and clothing are all extra time. (I now Needle Felt 2" - 3" realistic bears out of wool fiber)

Insetting paw pads, hand-sculpted noses, Yes-No mechanisms, specialty studio techniques for jointing and other trade secrets which set each artist apart all add to the time it takes to create these tiny treasures.
And unlike the artists who have the space in standard-sized bears, in which to work out all of these features, we miniaturists must make all of them work and look natural and in perfect proportion and scale—and all within fractions of an inch!

Please don't think of or dismiss miniatures as what you will see in an internet search for 'artist miniature bears' as was suggested below - World of Miniatures comes up near the top of that search by dint of number of sales, because they offer a very inexpensive product and can afford to put it into every type of retail and wholesale outlet available. These aren't considered 'Artist' bears, even though each prototype was designed by an artist (I was solicited several times to design for them and several other companies but their timelines are too short):

Please search for 'MINIATURE ARTIST TEDDY BEARS' - all 4 words, that will take you to the sites of hundreds and hundreds of individual working artists from all over the world, displaying a wide range of the types of techniques incorporated from every other type of Sculpting, Needle Felting wool/fibers, theater-work, metal work, jewelry design and other craft, and the majority use Mohair fabric, Sheep's wool, Alpaca and man-made fibers (rayon, nylon..) as the fabric for their bears. A small percentage of us recycle animal coats (mink/fox/etc) into teddies but do not use new pelts.

To see some cream-of-the-crop work, there is an international online competition in its final phase right now - inviting viewing and voting from the general public. This final vote is for Best of Show from among the top place winners in each category.
To see some EXCELLENT, OOAK, ARTIST, TEDDY BEAR and other animal work, please visit
http://www.bearsandbuds.com/URSA2009/URSAAwardsCompetitionFinalRoundofV\
otingBearsandbuds.asp
and cast a vote!
Thank you Threads, for giving me the opportunity to explain the difference in miniature teddy bears; why the ones seen in the Hallmark shops and W.O.M. will cost under $20 and true Artist bears may cost $750+.
But the Beanie Baby-type are good in that they foster a love for these tiny treasures and, as tastes mature, one may seek better quality and begin to look around for it, through internet searches, eBay sales, trade magazines and teddy bear shows. Then—real artist - collector connections are made and a new world opens up!

Re: Needle Felting Without Wool

Jim makes excellent points about adding a bit of ANY natural fibers between to help bind from above & below. And the needles do have several barbs along the sides, not at the tip (using the narrowest you can locate, preferably 42! to minimize the puncture holes.)
I've needled by hand for 10 years and have only one issue—the generic use of the word 'felted' to cover everything, both noun & verb.
The verb 'needled' (no, I'm not the grammar police here but this describes the action rather than the result) can be substituted for every place that the word 'felted' is used from #3 on down and it describes the action better and others will begin to associate this with dry felting work instead of the traditional wet felting work, which has always been referred to as just 'felt/felted/felting'.
Please use needle/needled/needler/needling when referring to our dry techniques?

Re: An Easy Way to Turn Bias Cording Right Side Out

Does anyone know if this cording would also be appropriate for piping on a bathing suit? Is there enough stretch in the cord?
- - - - -
Yes, if you leave enough extra length of the rat tail hanging out of the end of the 'tube' to pull in to snug up the fit and adjust in the final fitting. Of course this also depends on the style and materials your swimsuit is made of; many styles and materials do fine w/o the rat tail left inside.

But this produces a simple cord; if I'm understanding correctly, piping in its true sense needs the seam allowance on the outside to be sewn into the suit's seams. Perhaps CCSstudio is going to use this as a surface embellishment?
____________________

Is my mind going... or does the clematislover solution end up with the cord outside the tube?
- - - - -
Yes, no cord is left inside the tube as clematislover describes it, unless you follow Knit Daily's sew-the-center-of-the-rat-tail-to-the-short-edge-of-the-bias-strip-method.
Like clematislover, I too learned this other technique, but a very long time ago—in HS Home Ec class in the late 50s, for the spaghetti straps on our prom dresses that were the style then.

We knotted the cord, folded the bias strip over the cord (knot poking up on the outside) at the top short edge and sewed across the cord just under the knot, then sewed across this short half inch seam at the top edge with the zipper foot. Sew twice as insurance if your cord is thick or stiff as you'll be clipping the knot/cord off and the stitching may leave a gap.

If you were to use this cording to make, for example, surface embellishment like Chinese knots instead of sewing the ends inside of something like our straps, you'd want these end seam stitches to be even and tight.

Turn to come down the long side of the tube, right against the cord and after a few inches, clip off the knot, then begin to ease the end of the tube inside itself (great idea with the medical gloves!)

Continue to pull the cord as you sew and by the time you get to the end the cording is completely right-side out. No turning tubes needed!

I have designed miniature artist teddy bears since 1990 and the limbs of a 2" bear are sometimes only 3/4" long x 3/8" wide"—and furry napped inside as well; the devil's own time to turn right side out after hand stitching right along the edges with 20 sts to the inch.
These are treated in the same way: though these aren't nice straight bias-cut tubes, the same principle applies. I thank heaven for Sister Gregory, O.S.A., who insisted that every stitch be perfect or we rip them all out.....




Re: Molded Papier-Mâché Form

I posted this in the other Dress forums as well.
The expanding foam is available at most DIYs and Big Box stores, like Home Depot/Menards/Loewes (sp?) used to fill in around door and window frames, vents, anywhere that there're air leaks into the home.

rkr4cds1 writes: I TOTALLY agree with DARKSSYDE about using the expanding type of insulating foam inside of the Duct Tape Dress Form; however I partially filled the center with crushed & balled up newspapers first. The foam had room to expand inwards into the paper and outwards into the shell: I didn't need as much foam and its expanding action was more controlled as it filled.

Suchpae brings out the MOST valid point as well, that one must be conscious of the depth and width of the form: just making up the complete circumference in inches isn't the same as replicating a body's exact shape as the true dress forms do.

I made a second foam-filled form, and using the dowel idea, pushed the marked-depth-dowels through my duct tape form from front to back in the exact spot that they needed to be for my body, leaving approx 1" on the outside and then taped them in place, before stuffing in the newspaper (they helped hold the balls in place!) and before squirting in the expanding foam.

After the foam had cured I sawed off the ends that projected outside the form and sealed the spots over with duct tape. Now it truly is an exact replica of my body, with NO distortion from just stuffing it with polyester batting.

Thanks for your input & tips, Ladies!!
rkr4cds

Re: Quick and Easy Duct-Tape Dress Form

I also posted this in Dress Form #2:
rkr4cds1 writes: I TOTALLY agree with DARKSSYDE about using the expanding type of insulating foam; however I partially filled the center with crushed & balled up newspapers first. The foam had room to expand inwards into the paper and outwards into the shell.

Suchpae brings out the MOST valid point as well, that one must be conscious of the depth and width of the form: just making up the complete circumference in inches isn't the same as replicating a body's exact shape as the true dress forms do.

I made a second foam-filled form, and using the dowel idea, pushed the marked-depth-dowels through my duct tape form from front to back in the exact spot that they needed to be for my body, leaving approx 1" on the outside and then taped them in place, before stuffing in the newspaper (they helped hold the balls in place!) and before squirting in the expanding foam.

After the foam had cured I sawed off the ends that projected outside the form and sealed the spots over with duct tape. Now it truly is an exact replica of my body, with NO distortion from just stuffing it with polyester batting.

Thanks for your input & tips, Ladies!!
rkr4cds

Re: Close-Fit Duct-Tape Dress Form

I TOTALLY agree with DARKSSYDE about using the expanding type of insulating foam; however I partially filled the center with crushed & balled up newspapers first. The foam had room to expand inwards into the paper and outwards into the shell.

Suchpae brings out the MOST valid point as well, that one must be conscious of the depth and width of the form: just making up the complete circumference in inches isn't the same as replicating a body's exact shape as the true dress forms do.

I made a second foam-filled form, and using the dowel idea, pushed the marked-depth-dowels through my duct tape form from front to back in the exact spot that they needed to be for my body, leaving approx 1" on the outside and then taped them in place, before stuffing in the newspaper (they helped hold the balls in place!) and before squirting in the expanding foam.

After the foam had cured I sawed off the ends that projected outside the form and sealed the spots over with duct tape. Now it truly is an exact replica of my body, with NO distortion from just stuffing it with polyester batting.

Thanks for your input & tips, Ladies!!!

rkr4cds

Re: Grade Your Pants for a Perfect Fit

Also, I do cut the back of all of my pants on the straight grain: NO jeans orientation for me!
I hate the way that style cups around the buttocks and emphasizes them. Designers today use it in every style of pants/slacks and don't limit it to just jeans: that's a main problem and what drove me to finally developing my own slopers!

Re: Grade Your Pants for a Perfect Fit

Also, I do cut the back of all of my pants on the straight grain: NO jeans orientation for me!
I hate the way that style cups around the buttocks and emphasizes them. Designers today use it in every style of pants/slacks and don't limit it to just jeans: that's a main problem and what drove me to finally developing my own slopers!

Re: Grade Your Pants for a Perfect Fit

I have a problem with every pair of pants I wear; my own pattern or ready-to-wear: wrinkles form in the crotch area, beginning right along the seam between your #10 and 11 and then fan down diagonally away from the point of al 4 seams coming together, crossing the line between your #10 & 9, along my inner thighs toward my knees and never rise to even a straight horizontal level, but staying in a forward and downward sweep for about 5" in front of the inseam.

I can see where the back of the crotch depth may need trimming out (though it hangs and fits smoothly in standing and walking) but am unsure about what the front half needs, as that seems unaffected by the old axiom "The wrinkles point to the problem." The seamline fits best when it rises rather quickly and shallowly, nowhere deeply/widely cut as the back half of the crotch.

I have wider high hips than derriere (3" to 4" down is where I measure my 'hip' measurement), have a flat-ish fanny several inches thinner than my high hip and can get all the rest of my pants areas to 'hang from the waist' rather than hang up on my hips or anywhere else.

What is causing this set of forward-sweeping wrinkles? And how do I fix it?

Thank you - I've just tonight learned that you were 10 miles from me last Oct!!!
rkr4cds