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sewdolly


member

craft interests: embroidery, gifts, knitting, quilting, sewing, smocking

Member Since: 04/21/2009

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My newest purse

Here are two photos of the purse I recently finished.  I chose coordinating quilting cottons in brights on black, and bright green zippers (one on each side) close two of the pockets.  The front...


recent comments

Re: Video: A Neckline Binding for Knits

Very nice, clear video, with a good demonstration of sewing trim onto a T-shirt. I do it similarly, with some variation:

When I was teaching the Stretch and Sew method back in the early 80s--and when I first learned it back in about 1970--we applied ribbing much the same way. The differences: If applying ribbing, didn't try to figure out the trim measurement like Sarah does; instead we used a 2 to 3 ratio (rib measurement was 2/3 the neck or sleeve opening measurement) plus 1/2" for seam allowances; if using self-fabric (as Sarah is) with less than 80% stretch, we used a 3 to 4 (3/4) ratio, plus 1/2" for seam allowances. You measure the neckline by "walking" your tape measure on its edge around the folded T, from CF to CB, then double it (I just fold the tape measure over, but you can also do this mathematically). That's the full neckline measurement, then I fold the tape measure in thirds (or fourths) to get the 2/3 or 3/4 ratio, and add 1/2".

When I first learned this method, we didn't even know what a serger was (smile!), so we used two rows of slightly lengthened (3.0) stitches, one on the seam line and one halfway between the seam and the raw edges. As always, we stretched as we sewed--stretched the ribbing to match the opening and then a little bit more. For a U-shaped neckline, like Sarah is making, we would also stretch a little more thru the curves, and less thru the straighter areas.

Here it is, 45 years after I made my first t-shirt. I now have a computerized sewing machine with many different stitches, as well as a serger, and I still use the same method as I learned back then. I've made so many t-shirts (one husband, one son, 5 grands, several nephews, numerous babies, and myself have all worn t-shirts I've made) I could practically make them in my sleep, I think! LOL Frankly, I don't like the serger on t-shirts--I think it puts too much thread into the seam. I did make a t-shirt completely on my serger one time, and wasn't at all happy with it. But, that's me. As the saying goes, your mileage may vary.

Re: My newest purse

Thank you so much! I love brights-on-black prints, and have quite a few from which to choose. I've been enjoying using it.

Re: DVD Giveaway: Cozy Wool Wraps to Sew and Love

I would most likely make the cape--the scarf and shawl look too easy--something I could do without a pattern! Wish you had positioned things differently so we could see the cape, too!

Re: Moto Jacket

You did a very impressive job on your topstitching, as well as all those zippers!! Congratulations.

Re: Vera Wang inspired spring-time wedding dress

Your grandma would be So Proud of you!! I'm sure she would also be so pleased by your new interest in sewing, and that you are using her sewing machine.

Congratulations on your wedding, too. May you and your new husband have many years of happiness together!

Re: Book Giveaway: Summer Mystery Reading for the Sewing Enthusiast

I'm a Huge mystery fan (and a huge sewing fan, too--have been sewing for over 55 years!), and would really enjoy having these books. I have read one of Sharon Dunn's books in the recent past, and it was a terrific story!

Re: Book Giveaway: Summer Mystery Reading for the Sewing Enthusiast

I'm a Huge mystery fan (and a huge sewing fan, too--have been sewing for over 55 years!), and would really enjoy having these books. I have read one of Sharon Dunn's books in the recent past, and it was a terrific story!

Re: Vintage Sewing Books Make Great Modern Teachers

I love old sewing books, and have quite a collection, including several editions of the Sewing Made Easy that I see in the picture. It's interesting to see how the pictures change with the editions!! LOL

My oldest sewing book is from, if I remember correctly, 1923. Most of them are from the 40s and 50s, though. And one (title escapes me, and it's downstairs at the moment) has the most charming illustrations--I just HAD to have it!

A couple of books I inherited or was given; most have come from used book stores. And SOME of my "vintage" sewing books come from my own early years of sewing!! :-O

Charlotte