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How to End a French Seam Above a Vent

Make a smooth transition to a vent

Threads, Issue #210, August/September
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When you’re working with lightweight fabrics, a French seam is often the finish of choice. But if there’s a side-seam vent, you need a way to neatly end the seam and create a sturdy, good-looking treatment at the top of the vent. I’ll show you a clever method. Try it with shirt-weight linen, cotton, and sheer fabrics—the very textiles that call for a light, clean finish. Avoid applying it to loose or open weaves, however: You’ll end up with a hole at the point of transition. The process shown is for a pattern with 5/8-inch-wide seam allowances, but you can adapt it as desired for wider allowances in the vent area.

1. Thread-trace and sew the seam. Place the layers with wrong sides together. On the top layer, thread-trace the point where the seam ends and the vent begins, with crossed horizontal and vertical lines.…

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  1. sewing1942 | | #1

    It would have been easier to see if this was done on a plain fabric.

  2. User avater
    sew4th | | #2

    Just the technique I wanted to learn, but the illustrations were challenging. The fabric printed in tiny stitch-like lines seemed specially chosen to hide the stitches. (To be fair, Threads is usually very good at teaching complicated techniques with clear illustrations and photos.)
    After squinting at the magazine, I came to online in hopes of better illustrations and at least these same images were bigger on my monitor.
    Still, I love Threads and this method is just what I needed for my projects today.

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