Facebook Email Pinterest Twitter X Instagram Tiktok Icon YouTube Icon Headphones Icon Favorite Navigation Search Icon Forum Search Icon Main Search Icon Close Icon Video Play Icon Indicator Arrow Icon Close Icon Hamburger/Search Icon Plus Icon Arrow Down Icon Video Guide Icon Article Guide Icon Modal Close Icon Guide Search Icon

Conversational Threads

destinations in boston?

schoonerchick | Posted in General Discussion on

hi everybody! i got a job on another schooner so i’m headed to the boston area in a couple weeks. i’ve never been there before, and am wondering what the must visit stores/museums  are in the costume/fashion history realm. also leads on cool vintage/second hand stores would be great! thanks for any info in advance, and sorry about all of the ///’s!

Replies

  1. rjf | | #1

    Okay!  Well, you have to go Quincy Market which is like Baltimore's Inner Harbor.  Lots of shops and food places.  There is something called the Freedom Trail which takes you to many historical sites.  The Isabel Gardner Museum should be fun if you like the kind of museum that was originally a house (mansion? castle? palace?).  That's the one that had two Vermeers stolen a couple of years ago.  And I'm sure other will let know of vintage shops.          rjf

  2. sewphaedra | | #2

    I would skip Fanueil Hall, it's just a bunch of chain stores like Gap and William Sonoma. Instead head for Chinatown/garment district and get some great food and great fabrics. DiCarlo and Windsor Button are both on Temple street that runs between Boston Common (that's worth a walk through) and Downtown Crossing (check out the department store windows for hip fashions). Winmill Fabrics and New England Textiles are at the corner of Chauncy and Harrison, they're great to browse for bargains on end bolts (fairly good linens and woolens). From NET you can see across the corner the Ho Toy Noodle Company which is a fabulously exciting culture shock place to visit if you're not used to Asian markets. Eat lunch anywhere, it's all good.

    Go down by the water at Rowe's Wharf, it's gorgeous. You can keep walking along the water toward the New England Aquarium (aging, but still very nice), go past it and walk through the Long Wharf Marriott and you come out on the other side into Christopher Columbus park with its arbor promenade. You can sit outside for a bit and watch the ships and the airplanes at Logan, then turn left and head into the North End for fabulous Italian food and little shops. Just as in Chinatown, English is pretty much a second language there.

    Harvard Square is worth a visit to hear the street musicians and see a lot of cool little independent stores, plus the nation's largest independent bookstore: Wordsworth. If you walk out of Harvard Square along JFK toward the bridge there is a small mall on the right (past The Garage, I forget the name of the little mall) and in there is a good yarn store.

    That's what I would recommend for a first-time visit for someone who likes to sew.

    1. schoonerchick | | #4

      thanks for the suggestions! i have a feeling that my goal of not spending all of the money i earn and ending up with tons of stuff to ship home will be really hard to uphold!

      thanks rjf too, i could not figure out how to post this to both of you!

  3. sewphaedra | | #3

    Forgot to say that Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market are the same thing.

    As far as second-hand stores, there used to be a really good one near Kendall Square (hope it's still there) called The Garment District. Downstairs they have a bag price--one price for all you can stuff in a bag. Upstairs is better merchandise that's set up on racks and cool displays. Funky, new-style clothes.

    I'm sure there must be vintage places but I don't know them.

  4. Barbaran8 | | #5

    Every time I visit my sister in Boston she saves the paper from the week before so we have all of the coupons for Filene's basement! Then there is New England book fair in Newton... I've hauled back some *very* heavy suitcases after hitting that store - lots of sewing books at great discounts...

    1. User avater
      SuitsMe | | #6

      There is also a tiny fabric store that sells alot of oriental silk, and also lace on Beach Street between Washington and Harrison Ave in Chinatown.  It's between a parking lot and a parking garage.  (Sorry, but I can't place the name of the store.)

      You also MUST take a walk down Newbury Street in the Back Bay.  It shows off Boston's European roots.  At one end is the Ritz and designer stores, and changes to funky used CD and shoe stores for the college crowd at the other end.

      A stroll thru the Boston Common and Garden (at the head of Newbury St.) is also refreshing at this time of year.

      1. sewphaedra | | #7

        Is that tiny store near the Hotel Suisse (or whatever that swiss hotel is), on the same street? Or is it closer to Chinatown, near Winmill? I'm wondering if it's new, I don't remember a place with good china silks.

        There used to be a North End Fabrics near Winmill, right across the street from Ba Dat restaurant in Chinatown. They had fabulous fabrics, including a whole wall of silks from Thai Silks, but they closed about 2 years ago. That was a big loss. I think they moved out to the 'burbs.

        1. User avater
          SuitsMe | | #8

          From Winmill fabrics, go down the hill (Harrison Ave.) one block towards the center of Chinatown and take a right onto Beach.  It's on your right about a half a block down across from an alley.  They actually have to buzz you in (and out).  I was there about six months ago and they had a lot of bright Asian patterned silks with flowers etc.

          By the way, there is a cool Asian grocery store down the alley if you are looking for unusual seafood or vegetables.

This post is archived.

Threads Insider

Get instant access to hundreds of videos, tutorials, projects, and more.

Start Your Free Trial

Already an Insider? Log in

Conversational Threads

Recent Posts and Replies

  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |

Threads Insider Exclusives

View All
View All

Highlights