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fire retardants for clothing

sewchris703 | Posted in General Discussion on

I’m looking for a fire retardant product to treat clothing.  I have a client who smokes and gets small holes in her clothing from the cigarette ashes.  So far I haven’t found anything for home use, just for industrial use.  Does anyone have any suggestions?  You can e-mail me through my profile.

 

Chris

Replies

  1. rekha | | #1

    You might try to get advice from http://www.whaleys.co.uk/. I write this because they sold me a piece of cloth they treated with flame retardant.

    1. sewchris703 | | #2

      What I need is something that my client can use on her clothing after they are bought/sewn.  I'm sewing her some caftans/mumus that she can use as sleepwear as well as daytime wear.  She is in a wheelchair and the caftans are easy and comfortable to wear.  The fabrics are a poly blend--wash and wear, wrinkle free.

       

      Chris

      1. rekha | | #3

        This may sound flippant, but you could discuss this with the people at your nearest fire station. My reading of it is that you really need to look into the effects on skin/kidneys before plunging into this exercise. For example, the chemicals that are considered safe are http://www4.nationalacademies.org/news.nsf/isbn/0309070473?OpenDocument:

        The eight chemicals that the panel deemed safe at this point are hexabromocyclododecane, decabromodiphenyl oxide, alumina trihydrate, magnesium hydroxide, zinc borate, ammonium polyphosphates, phosphonic acid, and tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride. Although toxicity data for some of them are inadequate for certain routes of exposure, these chemicals were found to be safe even under the worst-case exposure assumptions.

        Search the internet further  http://www.google.co.uk/search?num=100&hl=en&newwindow=1&q=fire+retardant+chemicals&meta=

        Hope you have some luck; the alternative could be purchasing safe flame retardant treated fabric. I can tell you from experience that they don't smell nice and washing them washes off the retardant.

        1. sewchris703 | | #4

          Yes, that is what I've been reading on the internet.  I hadn't thought to ask my local fire department.  That's a great idea.

           

          Chris

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