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Hemming problem (new sewer)

Barbara_J_Solomon | Posted in The Archives on

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I have been learning to sew. I have made several t shirts which have turned out pretty well, but on a couple of them I tried to stitch with a double needle to hem the t shirt. My stitching was uneven in length and very hard to keep straight. What could be wrong? Thanks.

Replies

  1. el_pea | | #1

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    Sounds like you are working on single knit fabric.
    I've discovered that just a straight, regular stitch doesn't work well on knit fabric. The stitches like to skip. I bought a machine now that has a stretch stitch. It is fabulous. I also can use a double needle now for the first time. I tried it and found out that I have to be careful of the needle size for the fabric type. I have a "jeans" double needle which is made for denim and this needle doesn't work well on light weight fabrics. The "jeans" needle is a fatter needle and made for heavy weight fabric. Also I have to mess with the tension (upper tension only)so that the single bobbin thread can accommodate the two upper threads. I practice first on a scrape piece of fabric so I can get a good run.
    One thing you could do maybe too is put a little stabilizer inside the hem. A strip of interfacing or that new stuff you can buy which looks like a roll of tape I think it is "Seams So Great."

    1. silkscape_ | | #2

      *Ditto on the stabilizer. for some reason I think the roll of stabilizer might be called "stitch and ditch". In any case, it just looks like a roll of adding machine tape. If you use interfacing you won't be able to tear it away so use one that has some stretch to it.another thing to consider when using a double needle to hem is how you trim it. At first I used to trim them hem, then try to keep my stitching at the edge of it but from the right side. Very difficult. So now, i would just fold up the hem allowance (make it a little wider if necessary), then stitch from the right side adn lining the folded edge up with the guide on your machine, just like when sewing a seam. THEN go back and trim away the excess hem allowance above the stitching on teh wrong side of teh garment.Another way to possibly make it more stable is to take a strip of the same knit fabric, cut on crossgrain just like the shirt hem, adn insert it into the hem before stitching. It will stretch just like the shirt, but adds some extra stability (and hem weight too)good luck!

      1. Katydid_ | | #3

        *I like Dawn's idea of the inserted strip of fabric, I haven't tried that one yet. I know it will work.One thing that I like to do is to use spray starch and make the T-shirt fabric very stiff, then fold up the edge and stitch and then trim off the extra fabric [as Dawn has described]. The T-shirt needs to be washed before wearing.At times I use a large and wide zig-zag stitch and hem the T-shirts the same way that I do when using the blind hem stitch.

        1. Karen_Vesk | | #4

          *If the knit fabric is flimsy, I have sometimes stabilized it by fusing a narrow band of stretchy interfacing in the hem. This makes sewing with double needle or zig zag much easier, and also makes the finished product look better.

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