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Issue 117:sewing w/o instructions

rjf | Posted in Talk With Us on

What a good issue!  Lots of good information and the illustrations are very clear.  even the advertisements were interesting.  I just want to add an idea to the “sewing w/o instructions”.  When making pants or trousers, I think you get a better fit with a two-piece waistband and put the zipper in(fly-front, of course) before sewing the side seams and inner seams.  Put the waistband halves on and the back seam comes last and this allows you to get the waist just right and adjust for “seat sag”.     rjf

 

Replies

  1. DONNAKAYE | | #1

    Audrey Childress taught:

    "Seat sag" is (almost always) the result of center back seam in pants being cut on the off-grain.  She maintained that cutting the center back seam on the straight of grain (i.e., lengthwise) will solve a multitude of problems.  There are almost no commercial patterns available with this feature, so I use the pattern Audrey copyrighted and trace my own, with various alterations as needed for additional fitting issues (such as protruding abdomen, etc.).  Also, unless you're shrinking out the fullness from the pants leg to the knee (that is, the pants front to hang straight but the back leg to slightly curve inward, following the natural crease behind the knee -- much like the sleeve to follow the natural curve of the arm), you're going to get that "bootie sag."

    1. SewNancy | | #2

      There is an old set of pants fitting articles from Threads, they are in one of there sewing books too, that also shows how under seat wrinkles are caused by too angled a cb seam. I have done this and it works.
      Nancy

    2. SewNancy | | #3

      How are you doing this? I have taken out in this area and replace below the knee and that helps.
      Nancy

      1. DONNAKAYE | | #4

        Can you describe in more detail how you "take some out of this area"?  If I have some more info about exactly how you are doing that, I can help you.  Do you need instructions on straightening CB seam on a commercial pattern that cuts it off-grain?

        1. SewNancy | | #5

          I fold out the excess fabric measure the amount and fold it out on the pattern and add the same amount below the knee. Kenneth king has a different method in his pants sloper cd, He has y9ou pin out a dart of the excess material, than fold out the depth across the whole leg. After which you add the amount back by raising the waist at the side and by raising the crotch pt. I found that this creates other problems.
          Nancy

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