Facebook Email Pinterest Twitter Instagram YouTube Icon Headphones Icon Favorite Navigation Search Icon Forum Search Icon Main Search Icon Close Icon Video Play Icon Indicator Arrow Icon Close Icon Hamburger/Search Icon Plus Icon Arrow Down Icon Video Guide Icon Article Guide Icon Modal Close Icon Guide Search Icon

Conversational Threads

Lining tips?

Heidi_Evans | Posted in The Archives on

*
Hi! I’m an experienced self-taught seamstress with one weakness—I just can’t seem to do a lining that looks right. I have bought the materials to make a really nice winter coat( the one, in fact, that I have dreamed of owning ever since I saw it in Blade Runner). I’m kind of embarrassed about asking for help on something I have a feeling I should know, but this once I feel like I need a little advice. Do you just make the lining with the same pattern pieces( I’m modifying Vogue 2026, which is a fairly basic trenchcoat pattern and doesn’t seem to include a lining in the original plans) and attach it with a blind hem stitch at the edges, or what? I assume the pattern pieces used for the lining will need some size adjustment and trimming—is there a formula for this? Also, what tips do you have on working with fake fur? I’ve made a few simple ferret sleep-tubes with it, but my complex sewing has been on more conventional fabrics. Is there a way to make it fold flat on the hemlines(obviously ironing won’t work), or do I just have to stitch it down extra-tight?

Replies

  1. TJ | | #1

    *
    Whose coat, in Blade Runner? I'm curious!

    I would look in a good sewing book for lining advice; undoubtedly you'll get good help from others on this site. The lining should probably hang loose, not attached at the hem, and should be hemmed separately (can be machine-hemmed) a little shorter than the coat. Don't forget you have an opportunity to make secret pockets in the lining!

    RE: fake fur, I have read that you should trim the fur to eliminate bulk in the seamline. In effect, part it (so that you don't catch fur in the stitching) and give it a shave (remove the fur in the seam allowance).

    Good luck!

    1. Carrie_Schneider | | #2

      *It's a good idea to add some ease into the lining at a spot like the center back seam, if there is one. This helps give some extra room so the lining doesn't feel like it's pulling tight across your clothes. Basically, what you need to do is add a pleat back there that opens about 2 inches down from the neck, and closes a little above the waist. Just add about a 1" extension to your center back seam allowance starting at the top of the neck and ending down by the waist. First, stitch about a 1/2" seam down the extension. Now starting at the neckline, sew down about 2 inches where the seam line should be, then secure your threads. Start basting at this point all the way down to about an inch above where the extension ends, secure your threads, and start stitching again with a normal stitch length. Press the extension off to one side, then remove the basting. Hmmmmm. That may have been as clear as mud. You can email me at [email protected] if you have questions.Good luck!

      1. Jeffery_Diduch | | #3

        *I work in a tailored menswear manufacturer, and one of the things we do for our customers is replace linings after several years of wear, so I could write volumes about it. The MOST IMPORTANT thing about a lining pattern is to add ease. First, take the back pattern and add one inch to the center back to make a pleat. Baste this pleat closed during construction.Second, trace your sleeve pattern. Cut half an inch from the bottom, and add one inch to the top. This may sound silly, but for things to fit right, that's how it has to be done. The inch at the top will allow the lining to fold over the seam allowance left in the armhole without pulling.Side bodies are pretty much the same as the pattern but you may want to make them 1/4" wider. To do the front, trace the front pattern. Lay the facing over it and trace the facing placement. Mark your seamline on the facing's interior edge ( the one closest the bust). From that line, measure 5/8" towards the front (or whatever your seam allowance is); this is your cutting line. Before you cut, though, add AT LEAST 3/8" to 1/2" to the length of the lining, which you ease in two areas; around the hip and just above the bust area. Without this ease your facing can be too tight and cause pulling. A lining is supposed to enhance the drape of a garment, not interfere with it.Finally, if the pattern is relatively straight, it is reccommended that the lining be felled at the bottom leaving about 1/2" pleat (made by cutting the lining 1/2" shorter than the pattern piece and felling 1/2" away from the edge). If the pattern is flared at all, it is acceptable to roll the edge of the lining to about 1/4" or 1/2" finished, and make french tacks ( a thread chain between the lining and garment) at the seams to secure it. Hope this helps!

This post is archived.

Threads Insider

Get instant access to hundreds of videos, tutorials, projects, and more.

Start Your Free Trial

Already an Insider? Log in

Conversational Threads

Recent Posts and Replies

  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |

Threads Insider Exclusives

View All
View All

Highlights

Shop the Store

View All
View More