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Logic behind piecing patterns????

Fredwb | Posted in Patterns on

As I am still somewhat new to sewing and I am a man and tend to be logical 🙂

I am trying to understand why patterns are made so complicated, when they could simply show you what to do. You get a paragraph explaining hoe to do 5 steps and then ONE picture!!! I have to look at a picture and the instructions over and over to figure it out. (UGH)

But my main question is why (for example) on a dress the bodice has 3 pieces Front and 2 sides. After I put it together and looked at it I realized, the could have just had one piece to cut out on the pattern. That would seem much easier, faster, better etc. I am sure there must be some logical explination.

THANX!!!!!!!!!!
Fred

Replies

  1. beo | | #1

    logic behind picing patterns

    Fit is the reason.  And any pattern with more pieces is going to fit better.  For example, if a bodice could be created with just piece (and I really don't think that's possible), how would you allow for extra fabric over the bust and still have an armhole that fits?  Also, there's the question of altering.  The more seams, the easier it is to alter for a good fit.  I agree that the pattern companies are lousy at writing instructions, with the exception of Vogue's Claire Shafer and Sandra Betzina patterns.   I recommend that you buy Sandra Betzina's "Power Sewing, Step by Step."  It is one of the better illustrated sewing books I own.  And GOOD LUCK!

    1. Ralphetta | | #2

      logic behind picing patterns

      Fit!    One of my big complaints is that pattern companies tout their "easy" patterns for beginners as having only 2 or 3 pieces.  As beo just mentioned, with no seams you have no easy place to alter.  The result is an ill-fitting home-made looking garment and the beginner gets discouraged because they think it's them...when actually it is usually the bad pattern.  Experienced sewers make a muslin first and alter the pattern but a beginner doesn't usually know to do that.  It's true that cutting out more pieces takes more time...but every seam gives you a place to tweek and make the garment fit better.

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