Facebook Email Pinterest Twitter Instagram Tiktok Icon YouTube Icon Headphones Icon Favorite Navigation Search Icon Forum Search Icon Main Search Icon Close Icon Video Play Icon Indicator Arrow Icon Close Icon Hamburger/Search Icon Plus Icon Arrow Down Icon Video Guide Icon Article Guide Icon Modal Close Icon Guide Search Icon

Conversational Threads

Pants: To Crease or Not To Crease? …

Sandra_M._Brown | Posted in Fitting on

*
I love to watch the TV fashion shows (Style with Else Klensch, Video Fashion, and Fashion File). I have noticed that some hate couture pants no longer have the traditional creases down the front. I know that the pajamas-type pants are usually made without creases, but the styles that I am seeing are the more traditional pants. Does anyone have any criteria/opinions as to how to decide when to crease or not?

Replies

  1. Karen_Vesk | | #1

    *
    I don't really think there is a definite rule about creases in pants - only the personal preference of the wearer. It used to be said that tailored pants required creases, whereas softer (e.g. pyjama) or casual (e.g. jeans) did not get a crease. I've seen designers and manufacturers doing everything this year.

    There are no hard-and-fast rules on length either. Fashion suggests that this year's length is from anywhere below the knee to an inch above the ankle (to balance shorter blouse sleeve lengths), but I suspect we'll see a lot of those being made into shorts next summer.

    When I do custom pant-making for a client, I make a recommendation on what I believe looks flattering on them, then I back off and let them make up their own mind. Then I make a note of their preference on their measurement sheet and keep it on file for next project. The next time I make that type of garment for them, I ask if they still prefer that style, or whether they would like to try something new.

    1. Sandra_M._Brown | | #2

      *Thanks, Karen. When I started noticing the difference in creases, I thought perhaps I had missed some "rule".If anyone else has an opinion or a reference on this issue, I'd appreciation hearing your feedback as well.

This post is archived.

Threads Insider

Get instant access to hundreds of videos, tutorials, projects, and more.

Start Your Free Trial

Already an Insider? Log in

Conversational Threads

Recent Posts and Replies

  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |
  • |

Threads Insider Exclusives

View All
View All

Highlights

Shop the Store

View All
View More