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Pressing Seams

mawsev | Posted in General Sewing Info on

I need some help on pressing seams in a princess jacket. The fabric is a lightweight nubby plaid. I had no trouble pressing the princess seams, but the front edge facing and collar are giving me fits! It’s fully lined and all of the seams that are hard to press are two layers of interfacing and two layers of fashion fabric.

All seams were pressed flat and seam allowances trimmed in layers.

Someone recommended pressing over a dowel, but from which side?

 

Replies

  1. TashaGirl | | #1

    you would place the dowel on the underside next to the seam.  you then place a press cloth over the seam on the right side and press.  Have you tried pressing using a tailor board?  It is shaped to so that you can fit into some of those difficult areas for pressing.  You may also need to use a clapper - steam well then place the clapper over the seam and push down HARD until the area cools (if the fabirc is wool, you can even pound on the seam with it - hence the name!)  This helps flatten the turned seam edge.

    Tash

  2. User avater
    Becky-book | | #2

    you have pressed them 'flat'  (as stitched)

    now press the seam 'open' (seam allow. folded back) over your dowel, on the inside first then from the right side.

    now fold on the seam line and press the final shape. (since it's facings and collar)

    Hope this helps,

    Becky

  3. Teaf5 | | #3

    Good suggestions from previous posters; here's another:  peel the interfacing the seam allowances to reduce bulk even further.  If it's fusible, warm it gently with the iron, then peel it away from the fashion fabric; it will peel only as far as the seam line, so that you get the support you need in the facing but no extra bulk in the seam allowance.

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