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Professional Buttonholes

Marguerite_ | Posted in The Archives on

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Does anyone own a commercial buttonhole machine?
These make keyhole shapes and cut the cloth at the same time. I wondered if they are worth the price.

Replies

  1. marie_berman | | #1

    *
    I was just going to post the same question - unfortunately I don't have an answer. I live near Milwaukee and would like to find a dealer who sells these or knows about them. Does anyone know where to look for a buttonhole machine in the Milwaukee or Chicago area? Also, are there any inexpensive regular sewing machines that make professional looking buttonholes? My Kenmore certainly doesn't. It might be worth it to buy a second machine just to have buttohole capability.

    1. lin_hendrix | | #2

      *Hi Marie, My Bernina 1630 makes darn good buttonholes. The machine sews each vertical barfrom the top down so the zig-zags match. It's got a computerized memory so you make the first test buttonhole then each succeeding buttonhole is done entirely by the machine. It has several keyhole, pointed-end-tack, skinny, fat, knit, and eyelet style options. It is the main reason I bought this machine. It's also got a great "button sewing on foot" that can raise the height of the thread shank sewn for thick or coat type fabrics.and... I still have to use stabilizer on all buttonholes and have trouble slicing down the center without nipping the threads (because the two vertical bars are pretty close together).that said I'd still look at an industrial buttonhole machine and compare the quality with top of the line Bernina and Pfaff (I've heard the Pfaff buttonholes are pretty good too!).--lin

      1. Karin | | #3

        *Hello girls, I have a Janome 8000 that has three styles of buttonholes and it memorises after the first one. What i do after sewing the buttonhole is on the wrong side of fabric is put a small amount of Fray stop of clear nail polish and when that is dry I use a buttonhole chisel and cutting mat to slice open the hole. I wouldn't go to the expense of a button hole machine, I'd rather a button covering machine myself, but here in Australia they are very expensive.

        1. Bill_Stewart | | #4

          *Marguerite, you might try contacting the following: http://www.allbrands.com or 1-800-739-7374 or http://www.sewingmachine.org or 1-800-356-1784 The machine you are talking about is really a specialized industrial machine that produces the men's wear ready to wear type buttonholes. Normally industrial machines like that are VERY expensive. try the above. they may be able to direct you to one if they don't have it. Bill

          1. Chris_Wright | | #5

            *Marguerite,it is in my opinion that a commercial button-hole machine does not do as good a job as buttons that are hand-sewn. If you want to put buttons on a garment properly, take the expense of time rather than paying the cost of the machine. From my experience as a designer, the quality of the results are far more rewarding. Chris.

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