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Sewing Faux Shearling, Sherpa

Adriana | Posted in Fabric and Trim on

I have been wanting to make a coat from Faux Shearling, Sherpa, Sueded Sherpa type of fabric. I do have the fabric and the pattern but am unsure about the construction methods. Do you sew WS together and the seam is on the outside, do you lap the seams? Which method resembles the RTW items?

Replies

  1. TiffanyR | | #1

    Hi Adriana,

    I've seen it done both ways in RTW.  I made a jacket once many years ago with the same material, and started doing lapped seams, and didn't plan ahead about the sleeves.  They were one-piece sleeves, and the only way to sew them was to do WS's together- so not all the seams on the jacket matched, and it didn't look very nice.

    I think it would be easiest construction-wise to do WS's together, unless you're only making a vest.

    Perhaps a creative thinker out there could come up with a way to lap seams on a sleeve?  If you had a 2-pc. sleeve you could lap the front seam, if it were more visible, then just do WS's tog. on the back.  I think it would still bother me to have two different styles of seams.

    Best luck, Tiffany

    1. tinyluv | | #2

      My DH has a great shearling jacket. It is a semi fitted one. The RTW manufacturer seamed right sides together at the sides and the armholes and the sleeves. The rest were lapped. On Sew Much More, they showed how to do an easy lapped seam and I used it on a jacket I made my daughter, using 1/2 SA. You cut off the SA for the underpiece (Or the piece that lays under the lapped seam) and you keep the SA for the overpiece. Edge stitch and top stitch and you are good to go. I overlapped from top to bottom and then from the inside --> out on the front (meaning that the overlap was on the garment piece that the zipper/closure was attached to). That was what was done on the RTW garment. The neckline of the garment overlaps the collar (this was according to a Burda pattern I had). Hope that helps.

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