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Silk-screen painting

rekha | Posted in Fabric and Trim on

I read in a recent Belle Armoire an article about silk-screen painting but am unsure whether the procedure is commonplace. Has anyone any experience in this art? Is it easy to do?

Replies

  1. Michelle | | #1

    Silk-screening is actually a form of printing (as opposed to painting)

    A very fine mesh (I used organza) is stretched over a frame and the design is created on one side of the mesh, ink is poured on the other side and with the aid of a squeegy, the ink is spread (inside the frame) which has been placed on a sheet of paper ....... fabric ...... teashirt ......

    It's not all that hard to do but as with all techniques, it has to be learned.

    shelly in Jerusalem

    1. rekha | | #2

      What's this about creating stencils on the mesh with photosensitive emulsion and then paint as you say.

      1. Michelle | | #3

        There are many ways of creating designs for silk-screens. Silk-screen works on a stenciling principal whereby, the areas where one does not want the ink to pass through the mesh are blocked out.  One of the most common ways of doing this is using a photo sensitive emulsion whereby a stencil is created.

        There is no painting in this process - it is strictly a printing process - any number of 'prints' can be created using this method

        It is possible to create an image using several different screens one after the other in order to obtain various different colours or if you are working with a large screen one can pour smaller amounts of varied colours over smaller areas.

        In art circles we often refer to silk-screening as the 'monkey's medium' because virtually anything can be done and it always turns out looking great! :

        Andy Warhol was very famous for his silkscreens which he created in the 60's - you might like to try googleing to see some of his examples.

        regards,

        shelly in Jerusalem

        1. rekha | | #4

          Sounds absolutely monkey fascinating!

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