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Slot Seam

WestVirginiaWeaver | Posted in General Discussion on

In the January 2008 issue, the draped skirt featured a “slot seam.” I can’t figure out how this was sewn. Anyone know?

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  1. User avater
    purduemom | | #1

    If you have access to Threads #75, there is an article discussing the slot seam.  Quoting from the article, " A decorative seam with an underlay of matching or contrasting fabric, the slot seam is anchored with two rows of topstitching."  Sorry that I can't scan a picture, but my scanner does not seem to be cooperating.  I will try, instead, to give an adequate summary from the article. 

    Slash the pattern along the placement line for the slot seam.  If you want a 1" wide finished slot, you will have to add 3/4" seam allowances to each cut edge.  The underlay should be 1 1/2" wide and cut on grain.  Lightly interface each side of the slot unless the entire pattern piece is to be interfaced or underlined.  Baste the seam along the 3/4" seam line.  Press open and stitch each side to the underlay with a 1/4" seam.  From the right side, topstitch 1/2" from each side of the basted seam.  Remove the basting and stitch along across each end to stabilize. 

    These seams are a wonderful design element that can be used on sleeves, pockets, to incorporate buttonholes, down pant legs, etc. The seams can be straight or curved.  The article gave one example of a seam that had a bias cut plaid used as an underlay on seams constructed to lie 1/4" apart - very cool look!  To do this, the underlay was cut 1/4" wider.  When the basting was removed and the seam pressed, a gap was created between the slots showing off the bias strip.  Hope this helps.  Thank you for helping me remember this technique. 

    Sue

    1. WestVirginiaWeaver | | #2

      Sue, Thanks for the reference to the previous article. I'll go fetch it from my stash.I suppose the slot seam was for decorative purposes in that skirt?? I haven't located any way to get INTO this skirt - the front pleat would be logical, but there is stitching in the underlay that would seem to prevent entry there. Cyndi Bolt

      1. Josefly | | #3

        Now that you've described the skirt further, I remember that article. There was quite a bit of discussion about that skirt in this forum shortly after the article appeared. Many of us thought it looked like the opening under that front pleat had been stitched shut. But apparently the photo was deceptive, and that stitching doesn't close the underside of the pleat, and that is the way you get in and out of the skirt. The slot seams can make a nice design feature, depending on how they're stitched and what's used underneath them.

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