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Conversational Threads

Time magazine article

Ralphetta | Posted in General Discussion on

I just got my new Time magazine and there is a feature article on sewing being back in style.  After reading all the discussions about the recent content of Threads, I was interested in Time’s assessment of current sewers.  Basically it said people wanted clothes that FIT and they wanted things that were UNIQUE and that’s why they were sewing.  Saving money was not as important.  I think that is what I’ve been reading by contributors to Gatherings. I didn’t read anything that made me think there was a reason to “dumb” down Threads.  If you read it, what did you think? 

Replies

  1. lovestosew | | #1

    Hi Ralphetta,
    Always enjoy your posts - I just wanted to say THANK YOU (I know it's "yelling" but I feel very strongly about the whole subject) for letting us know of this article. I haven't read it yet - I'm running out the door to get a copy as soon as my husband gets home. What's on the cover (so I don't go and buy the wrong issue)?
    Julie

    1. Ralphetta | | #2

      The cover says WHY WE WORRY ABOUT THE WRONG THINGS.  The sewing article is just 2 pages so you could read it at the stand and save your money.  It's pages 100-101.

      Let me know what kind of sewer you think they are talking about. 

      1. Josefly | | #3

        Interesting article. Thank you for pointing it out. I read it online. The focus of the article seems to be on younger women, learning to sew from teachers other than their mothers, who bring to sewing a new kind of energy, perhaps "unhampered" by the kind of reverence for "correct" methods that some of us grey-hairs have...seems there was a suggestion there that if older ("stodgy" I believe it said) women were in the classes the younger ones wouldn't be there. There has been a lot of discussion about whether the kind of sewing done by these new, young sewists is inspiring and creative or simply careless and shoddy workmanship, and when articles about some of the "young" techniques appear, some readers view them with disdain. I do find the younger sew-ers' interest in using parts of old garments to create new ones a refreshing and inspiring idea that I probably would never use directly myself - as I probably would never wear a garment with raveling, exposed seams that have been used so much recently - but the freedom to mix unusual textiles might rub off on me a little. The article doesn't really deal with older sewists, some of whom have dug deeply into sewing techniques, or others who've come back to sewing after many years, and who need up-to-date information on the new techniques, fabrics, interfacings, stabilizers, and machinery available. It would be interesting to know more about the age distribution of these newcomers to sewing.The sewing studios described - where time on sewing machines can be rented and expertise of experienced sewists is available - isn't that a great idea?

        1. cookrose | | #31

          You expressed my thoughts almost exactly in your post!I'm seeing a kind of friction in the home sewing world, between older sewers who represent the "old guard," and new, younger, still-learning sewists who want quick projects with a minimum of pesky education in the discipline.I'm neither the "grey hair" these young girls dismiss so quickly, nor the hipster chick cutting up a T-shirt into a bikini.It's interesting to listen what non-sewers of any age say about sewing. Either they fondly remember their family members sewing, or wistfully remark that they wish they had the skills, too.I've learned much from those who work with only fine fabrics and use advanced techniques. And I enjoy new sewists' sense of adventure, even if I find their disdain for the discipline a bit irksome. I feel like sooner or later, the urge for more sophisticated projects will take over among a lot of the current T-shirt snippers. This doesn't solve our problem of what is happening to fabric stores, however. — Roseana>>>Interesting article. Thank you for pointing it out. I read it online. The focus of the article seems to be on younger women, learning to sew from teachers other than their mothers, who bring to sewing a new kind of energy, perhaps "unhampered" by the kind of reverence for "correct" methods that some of us grey-hairs have...seems there was a suggestion there that if older ("stodgy" I believe it said) women were in the classes the younger ones wouldn't be there.There has been a lot of discussion about whether the kind of sewing done by these new, young sewists is inspiring and creative or simply careless and shoddy workmanship, and when articles about some of the "young" techniques appear, some readers view them with disdain. I do find the younger sew-ers' interest in using parts of old garments to create new ones a refreshing and inspiring idea that I probably would never use directly myself - as I probably would never wear a garment with raveling, exposed seams that have been used so much recently - but the freedom to mix unusual textiles might rub off on me a little.The article doesn't really deal with older sewists, some of whom have dug deeply into sewing techniques, or others who've come back to sewing after many years, and who need up-to-date information on the new techniques, fabrics, interfacings, stabilizers, and machinery available. It would be interesting to know more about the age distribution of these newcomers to sewing.The sewing studios described - where time on sewing machines can be rented and expertise of experienced sewists is available - isn't that a great idea?<<<

          1. Josefly | | #34

            Thanks for your comments. Yes, there's inspiration to be taken from both the inexperienced with fresh ideas and the expert with sophisticated techniques. I was interested that some of the young sewists were using fabrics salvaged from garments found in thrift stores, and perhaps even parts of the garments themselves. This demonstrates to me an appreciation of fabrics, and perhaps of the kinds of added stitching details not found so much in rtw. Is that something we all have in common, along with the wish for better fit and style?

          2. KathleenFasanella | | #37

            Roseana wrote:"I'm seeing a kind of friction in the home sewing world, between older sewers who represent the "old guard," and new, younger, still-learning sewists who want quick projects with a minimum of pesky education in the discipline."There's still another friction of which I've been aware for years, that of people who have a LOT invested in having learned things a certain way, perhaps better described as a mind set. I'm not saying the old guard should adopt shoddy workmanship standards typical of young diy crafty types but much of what the old guard knows, just isn't so. I'm not seeing anything "new" with regard to method there. Young blood can shake things up, disturbing the paradigm. I've found it easier to teach people who's practices aren't cemented to tradition. They don't have the same prejudices (that efficiency means junk). With time, I'm optimistic and hoping they'll go further than we have.
            http://www.fashion-incubator.com/mt/archives/the_cognitive_dissonance_of_experts.htmlAn update regarding the time magazine article and first samples: The Today Show will be filming a segment at Shauna's studio in Austin in January. No word on the date of airing. I'll keep you posted.

          3. cookrose | | #38

            >>There's still another friction of which I've been aware for years, that of people who have a LOT invested in having learned things a certain way, perhaps better described as a mind set.<<Hi Kathleen,Okay, granted. But here's an example of what I'm really getting at here: Is it SO much trouble to learn to refer to fabric faces as the "right side" and "wrong side"? One such new hipster gal book for novice sewists calls them the "party side" and "business side."I guess if you're only ever going to learn something about sewing this one time, doing one project, following this one book, it doesn't matter what you call them.But if you'd like to gain more skills and knowledge, say, from someone more experienced, asking her if you start a seam with "party sides" together is kind of strange. Wouldn't it be better to know what the terminology is from the outset? I just think part of joining and then reinventing an art or craft is understanding the conventions, first. And if you're going to flout the rules, make an impact.Yours in party sides and in business,
            Roseana :)

          4. KathleenFasanella | | #40

            eeek!
            Party side and business side?
            Ouch.
            Yeah, you need to learn the rules before you can break them.I defer to your obviously superior knowledge :) and go back to dealing with emails from hipster chicks who can't be bothered to compose a real sentence. Everything is text message shorthand. Apparently, their sewing follows the same conventions.....?

          5. AmberE | | #47

            Yes, isn't that something? That's why we work so hard at Threads and especially with the new Sew Stylish to put in the correct information. It's important to know the rules if you are going to break them!

          6. AmberE | | #45

            I think that eventually all sewers move to the same place---as the passion grows, so does the interest in honing technique.

          7. cookrose | | #48

            >>I think that eventually all sewers move to the same place---as the passion grows, so does the interest in honing technique.<<

            Oh sure. If you love and want to master something, you become attuned to the discipline's techniques. Far from being a cumbersome slowing down of creativity, proper technique actually helps you become more productive.That's why I find the "oh, it doesn't matter what it's really called" attitude among beginners (and those who would teach them) so irksome.By the way, I still like Threads and I think broadening the magazine's mission toward new sewists is essential. — Roseana

          8. AmberE | | #49

            Yes, and that's why I also take umbrage with the use of the term "dumbing down" when referring to material is merely more accessible. It's an attitude toward beginners that doesn't show much generousity of spirit. These newer sewers just don't have the advantages that core Threads readers have had---often, they had no one to teach them. In the spirit of passing on the craft, there has to be mentoring there, or the craft will go out with this generation that did so much to bring it along. That's was the spirit behind the Teach Yourself to Sew insert---to ask our readers to join in the campaign of passing knowledge. My worry also is that on these forums when beginners are referred to with such disdain, that it doesn't do much to encourage them to return. That's not what we want---the pool of sewers has been shrinking in the past few years and it needs new blood.Of course, the information for new sewers must also be intelligent and elegant and something that is of use to anyone at any level.

      2. User avater
        VKStitcher | | #4

        Thanks for telling us about this article, Ralphetta.  In case someone can't make a trip to the newsstand, here's a link to the article, "Circling Back To Sewing":http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1562966-1,00.html

        The article mostly talks about young women (20's & 30's) who want trendy and unique clothes.  Although I'm not in this demographic (I'm fast approaching 50, and have been sewing since I was 6), I sew for some of the same reasons as the younger people who are now discovering our art/craft.

        The quote from the article "They're really sick of not being able to find clothes they like that fit them the way they like" describes the main reason I sew for myself.  My style is more "classic" than "trendy", but I want to wear things that are made well and fit well, which is hard to find in the mall stores.  I also enjoy the creativity aspect, the "making something from nothing".  I also sew items for my home, and so I have unique things that suit my style and aren't like everyone else's.

        Vickie  :-)

        1. AmberE | | #5

          I would say that the new and returning and experienced sewers have a lot in common. Just to set the record straight, we are not intentionally and will never "dumb down". Threads has always aimed to be both accessible and intelligent, to instruct and inspire---and it is definitely a challenge to reach across several levels. Yet I do find that all sewers share many core characteristics, particularly in being discerning and inquisitive, intelligent and creative, and so forth!

          1. jane4878 | | #6

            I've only just started sewing (bought a Pfaff hobby last spring).  I'm 44--that doesn't mean I can't be fashionable too.  I'm by nature a very fussy person (I'm a lab tech--read "very anal") and I like the perfect seams and the fancy sewing and embellishments (not that I'm anywhere near there in ability).  Like everything else the younger people in the article will be split between perfectionists and slap-it-together types.  I wear scrubs all the time and I want to look fashionable when I go out.  You can take ideas from the fashion magazines and use what suits your figure and lifestyle without looking like mutton dressed as lamb.  RTW never fits me either--small waist, big butt and I'm smaller on top.  I like the uniqueness of making your own clothing.  I've only one issue of Threads to judge from--the obi belt one and I wouldn't have bought it unless some of the articles suited my level, but there was also stuff waayyy over my head that I could use in the future.

          2. AmberE | | #7

            Great to hear from you, Jane!

        2. thehat | | #23

          that we are not all as big as a wafe or a tall as  a willow and that is why we sew and use our sewing rooms to enjoy the freedom of thoughtand expression threw sewing

  2. Dorothy | | #8

    There was a similar article in the Wall St. Journal with the last few weeks, saying that young women were sewing again; that studios where you could sew were popular and that, yes, it's an expression of individuality and a desire for clothes that fit.

    I predict we'll be hearing a similar "article" on NPR soon.

    What's old is new? 

    --Dorothy

     

    1. KathleenFasanella | | #36

      Dorothy wrote:
      "I predict we'll be hearing a similar "article" on NPR soon."As ever, NPR was first, months ago. Last May as a matter of fact. I wrote about it here if you want to see it, links to the story etc:http://www.fashion-incubator.com/mt/archives/sewing_machines_on_npr.html

  3. BarbSewAndSew | | #9

    Thank you so much for sending info about the TIME article. I would have missed it completely. Now lets just hope the upswing will bring back the fabric stores. They sadly are disappearing.  Barbara

    1. Ralphetta | | #10

      I am puzzled by the whole "resurgence in interest in sewing" thing.  Several years ago I was excited to read in Faith Popcorn's book about upcoming trends, etc.,  that there would be a renewed interest in, among other things, sewing.  Immediately afterwards, three fabric stores in my area closed!  I live in a medum sized city, but I've watched a steady decline in fabric stores and recently the old, top-of-the-line fabric store in town announced they are closing.  It doesn't seem logical that if there is a resurgence,  I would only have Hancock and Jo-Ann to chose from. The media keeps telling me sewing is "in" but I don't see any evidence of it.

      I'm puzzled. 

      1. Betakin | | #11

        I have 6 married kids..3 are girls and I have 3 daughters in laws and 26 grands including great grands and a few married grand daughters. I have given machines and sergers to all of my daughters and daughters in laws and some machines to grand daughters. When they want something done..even mending..they ask me to do it for them. LOL. Oh, I love to do it but I cannot understand why they don't do it themselves because I find sewing relaxing plus my machines are my toys. I have fun with them. I really don't know why they don't feel the same.

        My oldest girl makes her own scrubs for work at times and a couple of the DDIL's made curtains etc. for their kids rooms. I love making clothes and things for their beautiful babies (my grands) as I did for my kids and I also worked full time. It is my main enjoyment and I don't want them to quit asking me to do all of their sewing..I just don't understand why they do not sew, especially when they have good machines and sergers. They do have their crafts when it comes to home decor, painting etc. and jewelry making. I suppose we all have different ways to relax and create but with different toys.

      2. Alexandra | | #12

        Cliches about age sure do die hard.  We no longer look like our grandmothers did at 50, 60, 70.  I'll bet my motorcycle that the Times article was written by a young person.  As an older sewist I'm still as interested in sewing as I was in the previous decades, it's just that I need to dress age appropriately, bare midrifts just isn't me, nor is the deconstructed look.  Although that thought brought to mind, my renegade dress in the early 80s I made out of Qiana,(not sure even how to spell it any more, it was a slinky duPont polyester knit.  I couldn't find a successful way to hem the fullish skirt or the bodice ruffles and as it was a knit and didn't ravel I just left the cut edge unfinished.  My sewing friends were aghast!  But I thought it was an appropriate finish for the fabric.  I sew for uniqueness and fit, that doesn't make me a fuddy duddy because I'm not sewing what the 20 year olds are.   I also do crochet, does that call up images of gray haired old lady?  For may people, yes it does.  But I make slinking rayon scarves covered in beads and also crochet jewellery with silver wire and semi precious stones, which are very unique and kewl. *G*

        Our high end fabric stores have all closed too, and I think it has something to do with the population wearing more casual clothing, less call for fabulous suit and blouse fabrics.  I find myself buying fabric online more and more because I can't find quality or the right colour in my town.  I have also, with GREAT regret, cancelled my Threads subscription.  It just doesn't speak or inspire me.

         

        1. MarshaK | | #13

          The dress you mentioned you didn't hem in the 80's---doesn't Linda MacPhee from MacPhee's Workshop advise us to do just that, or should I say not do that? According to her, if the fabric doesn't ravel, don't bother with hems. I must say, I find it hard to 'let go' of my Home Ec sewing lessons where each piece had to be sewn properly with facings, hems etc.

          As to the 'resurgence of sewing' the others were talking about, I think that has come about from the home makeover shows that have cropped up where pillows and other simple home decor items are whipped up without regard to the quality of the sewing.

          MarshaK.

        2. Ralphetta | | #14

          The Time magazine article says that many women are interested in sewing because they are unhappy with the fashions currently available.  There are probably many of them who are unhappy, like you, with the bare middles and hipsters.

          I think you make a good point about casual dress contributing to the decline of the better fabric stores.  I hadn't thought of it in those terms.

          1. WandaJ | | #15

            For me, I do hope that this new or renewed interest in sewing brings about many more classes focused on how to fit or alter a pattern in small towns or not so large cities like where I reside in what's called the Miami Valley in OH!

          2. kayrosie | | #16

            It seems like everything makes a full circle. My granddaughter likes ro sew and seh likes to design her own stuff.  She is getting so picky I almost can not please her in clothes. I am still trying though. But I am glad there is an upswing in sewing. Maybe we will see better fabric and better tv shows about sewing. We could use something new there besides just quilts and craft shows.

          3. AmyC | | #17

            Wanda,I'm in the Miami Valley too! Have you taken any classes at the Stitching Post in Centerville? (I took one a few years ago, and the main thing I learned is that I can't sew for 3 hours nonstop.)I wish we had a store that focussed on fashion fabrics and embellishments. To my knowledge the Stitching Post is the only store in the Valley that sells high-end fashion fabrics. - Amy

          4. WandaJ | | #18

            Hi Sister MiamiVallian :-}. Perhaps this is not the forum to discuss our local Stitching Post, however, since we are here and on the subject here I go,.,.,.I don't like the primary staff, owners,.,.,.My experience with them was several years ago at a Martha Pullen Workshop they were co/sponsoring. During the workshop as well as when I went in their store afterwards (both the old one and new one) they were snotty acting, and also acted as if they just did not have time to be bothered with my trivial 6 yd purchase of black linen.

            After that, I had no time for them and have purchased 99.9% of my fabric via the Internet and the Hancock Fabric Store that is across from what is now the new Mall, The Greens.

            Too, I have not seen any courses they offer that really get to the heart of what I'm looking for and that is fitting/pattern alteration. Their new flyer was received just last week and I still found nothing meeting my interest.

          5. AmyC | | #19

            Hi Wanda,I'm going to start a thread about sewing in the Miami Valley...Amy

          6. WandaJ | | #20

            Thanks for letting me know about your plans Amy. I look forward to hearing more about this exciting endeavor.

          7. mem | | #21

            Sewing is all about delaying gratification, working at something and enjoying the process . That is something that western cultures have lost recently and I think that young people are finding out that it lifts the human spirit to be creative and to work at something . Sewing is also only fun once a certain degree of skill is attained and I think that if you can get young people feeling that they are achieving something even if its not what you might be happy with then some will go on to be bitten by the "do it right " mentality and some will just throw things togther as they always have .Either way its surely a good thing that people are being active creators and not just passive consumers. I think that the creative aesthetic in Threads is one of the things I love about this magazine . It showes in the graphics and the styling of each page so good job Threads and keep it up.

          8. Josefly | | #22

            I agree with much of what you've said, mem. Yesterday I saw a dressmaker's shop with a sign in the window offering sewing classes for teens. I went in to ask about the classes, and she said that she hasn't had much satisfaction teaching teens...they expect too much, she said, like being dress designers after one class, and they have so many activities that it's hard for them to stick with a sewing course long enough. She's been to school and had a lot of training to do what she does, she says, and most teen-agers don't get that it takes lots of practice and time to develop skills, as well as training to learn about fabrics, sewing techniques, design, etc. So what you've said about delayed gratification rang a bell with me. I've been wondering why my daughter-in-law, who has a great eye for fabrics and colors and putting things together, and who has a better sewing machine than I do, still comes to me to sew for her instead of doing it herself - not that I mind. I think the answer is that other hobbies which don't take so long to acquire skills for, provide creative satisfaction for her. And I remember how many frustrating projects I had to go through - and still do - before I was happy with anything I sewed. Sewing is also rather expensive hobby to learn, unlike beading, scrapbooking, even knitting or crocheting, where a person can create something rather quickly without having to buy so many notions! Sewing offers a lifetime of learning and continuous challenge if one wants that, but there's a rather long learning hump at the beginning.

          9. AmberE | | #28

            I've been hearing about classes with teens and children being filled to overflowing. Has anyone else seen this trend?

          10. stitchintime | | #29

            My 10yr. old neice is on her 2nd sewing course and my sister says she loves it as much as she loves playing hockey. She started during the summer and made simple shorts, skirts and tops (the teacher does the serging for them) and wowed her older brothers and sister and their friends (You made that yourself!?). She's busy making simple pj's and seems to be hooked.

            My sister bought her a mechanical window model machine that was marked down. She said it would be cheaper to buy pj's in Walmart (after my neice makes a mistake in cutting out and my sister has to buy more fabric) but thinks it's great that my neice is so happy and so busy.

          11. AmberE | | #30

            that's great---it is about the process, right!

          12. AmberE | | #27

            thanks and i couldn't agree more about process. if i don't sew for a couple of weeks, i just don't feel right---the process of sewing is very calming.i think that we can do a lot to inspire new sewers---a lot of people get to that level where they can execute a pattern but don't know how to go beyond the pattern. with those advanced skills, the creativity is endless!

          13. sunnycenter | | #32

            Most of the fabric at Joann's and Hancocks is so crafty quilty and even alot of emphasis these days on "no sew" this and "no sew" that. I wish they would get the message that there are those of us whose taste in fashion actually moves beyond wearing holiday prints and prairie point vests.
            These days I'm all over the place including the internet trying to find the right fabrics and notions to try and make some clothes that don't scream home made.

          14. Ralphetta | | #33

            When I read the article it made me hope it meant there might be an influx of better fabric stores.  For a long time I've been aware that sewing is an expensive "hobby,"  because there aren't very many stores competing against each other for customers.  If I didn't  have a substantial backlog of notions, interfacing, and tools it would be impossible to go pay full price every time I  need to make one garment.  I watch for sales, etc. because I know there are certain things I will need. I don't have to buy everything at once.

            I was in hopes that if it got popular, as the Time article suggested, more affluent sewers, with more demanding taste might, in turn, result in better fabric choices.

            Adult sewing classes might at least educate people about fabric.  It seems to me that  due to environmental concerns, people are becoming more knowledgeable.  It has always surprised me when an educated person mentions "satin" and then I realize they mean silk, etc., etc.  The more education people get, the more we all benefit.

             

          15. JanF | | #35

            OOOH - you've just made my day!
            After posting a letter about teaching textiles in schools I then found your letter strand and it did stike home to me.
            Ive lost count of the number of times I get pupils at school refer to satin who then get "huffy" when I correct them and patiently go into fabric weaves etc.
            I sometimes think that there is the need for a large poster in my room which defiantly states that Satin is a "look" and "feel" and not the actual fibre content!
            As for types of weaves - I have so little time for teaching "design and make" that weaves etc. can only play a minute part of my curriculum - even though it appears to me a basic!
            Mind you I see adverts for clothing the continually say the the fabric = satin - so even magazine compilers don't understand it! - of course Threads would never make that "faux pas"
            I shall be interested to read what other "Gatherings" contributers feel I ought to be teaching in school!

          16. AmberE | | #46

            hear hear!

  4. KathleenFasanella | | #24

    (Briefly delurking here) The Time magazine article made mention of my friend Shauna at First Samples (http://www.firstsamples.com). Her business is a little different than they described. Her angle (and mine) is helping people get into manufacturing rather than teaching sewing per se. We've both seen a jump in the number of people who want to start responsible small sewing operations in the states -I wish Time would write about that! However unpalatable and unrealistic it may be, we agree that project runway has stimulated some interest in the field. Head over to Shauna's site or mine (http://www.fashion-incubator.com) if you're interested in anything like that. Also, I will be in Austin this weekend, doing some classes at First Samples if you happen to be local, although I do know there are a few people coming in from Houston and Dallas too. See Shauna's site for details (http://firstsamples.com/classes/signup.cgi?series=4&id=04). Time's article isn't the first (somebody mentioned F Popcorn, I caught that too, way back when). There was a story on NPR a couple of months ago that sewing machine sales were way up. Still, knowing sewing people like I do, I can only wonder how many were bought by people who already had three, four, seven or ten machines! (I'll go slink off now and ruminate over my most recent purchase of a five thread safety stitch...and wonder how I can justify purchasing a coverstitch...)

    1. Carmelicious | | #25

      Kathleen,

      I am glad you wrote in to explain about Shauna's goals for her studio. I have taken several classes at First Samples and the students that attend are quite varied. Some are younger women but there were some students who were not so... myself included.

      Some do want to go into the fashion industry and/or start their own business. But, there are others who just wanted to learn to sew or to have better fitting clothes/fashions. I myself was a quilter for many years and felt intimidated by patterns and garment sewing. I highly recommend First Samples for the beginner, intermediate or experienced sewist for whatever goals they have in mind. I read the Time article with interest and hope this inspires all women (and young girls, the earlier the better) to sew.

      Heather

  5. Teaf5 | | #26

    Thanks for the heads-up! Turns out my colleague had already left me a copy of the magazine turned to that article, but it had gotten lost under a pile of papers until you mentioned it.Imagine my surprise when I saw the fabric being fitted on the model in the middle--it's from a set of sheets I had in the 1970s or 1980s!I am very glad to hear that sewing is enjoying a resurgence of popularity; maybe teaching it would be a good second career for me after retirement or a good way to use my empty-nester time in the near future.

  6. autumn | | #39

    I just read the Time article on-line.  I also think it was written by a young person. I am very put off by the repeated references to "grey-hairs", etc.  They seem to think that anyone over 40 is an old fuddy-duddy and frumpy, who couldn't possible sew anything interesting to young people. I was only 10 when I started sewing, so how could I have been an old grey-hair.  I am so sick of reading about "Boomers", and "It's not your grandmother's chocolate cake", or things to that effect. I guess they view everyone over 40 or 45 as not worth the time of day.  That article could just as well have been written without all the insulting references.

    1. solosmocker | | #41

      This grey hair did her time remaking garments out of thrift store finds, doing machine quilting (at the time taboo), and basically sewing a lot of very creative, made with mediocrity, types of garments back in the day. Then one day I decided I wanted to learn how to REALLY sew and make clothes the quality of those in high end stores or better. I promised myself to try a new technique with every garment made and I did, expanding my skills and my immature wardrobe into something I could wear to a board meeting with pride. I took classes then taught classes. Their time will come and we need to be their for them. Everything comes in cycles.

    2. Betakin | | #42

      The other night on a major network evening news they showed how the interest is sewing is becoming trendy among all ages including men.  Both men and women were shown sewing at machines. The men did appear older but the women were of all ages and if I remember correctly, some childeren were also shown. I believe there was focus on embroidery machines creating the new interest.

      1. JanF | | #43

        re. learning to sew - skills - correct terminology, methods et al!
        I agree with you all - to some degree!
        Let people experiment all they want to - that's creativity for you surely! However, if people learn the correct names for methods etc. in the first instance - I can't see why there should be any problems!
        I know what things are called - and my pupils use the correct terms too - there is nothing more annoying to me as a teacher - for the pupils to call a skill/tool by an incorrect use of ANY terminology!!! However, that does not stop me teaching them easier, short cut methods for processing something and drawing their attention to a new skill on the block and adapting it. If people want to learn - they won't mind learning the correct way!
        There has been a tendency in education to simplify too much, in order to "engage" the pupils and I suppose this is what some "old timers" object to. I do myself - - a case in question - not neatening the edges of fabric on items of clothing (professionally, something in me rebels at this every time!) but that was a method used to decorate some C18th, beautiful clothing so how can I object to pupils wanting to do that?
        I still think people should know how to do something properly!
        After saying all that - I've just put an order in for a Gemagic (gadget for attaching gems/rhinestones)after seeing it advertised this morning on the shopping channel!'cos loads of kids want to jazz up items by sticking jewels all over their things. I've always balked at this 'cos its a terrible thief of time and i've never rated it that much as a design process either(that shows how prissy I can be!)cos some kids just stick jewels everywhere and think that's textile design - and I don't!!.
        I'll let you know if it is a successful purchase!

      2. Jumala | | #44

        Me think I saw the same news program. This old man of 53 has been sewing for 4 years now. Perhaps I am the leader of the pack! What can an old man do nowadays?Can't drive a car fast. The young ladies don't want me. Hmm. Now to find decent fabric stores and learn how to knit!

        Dennis

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