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underlining/interfacing

marye | Posted in General Sewing Info on

I’m in the process of making a casual jacket. Butterrick #5088 view C. I don’t really want to line it so I was going to fuse knit  interfacing to the wrong side & sew it up from there. The interfacing/underlining (same thing, some call it one thing others call it the other) will be inside the entire jacket to give the fabric a bit more body. I’ve never done this without a lining so I wanted to get some feedback.

Thanks, MaryElise

I’m sorry I’m can’t give a link to the pattern picture, I don’t know how to to that. 🙂

Replies

  1. Pattiann42 | | #1

    I've used this technique and it works very well.

    Is this the pattern? 


    Edited 3/2/2008 3:23 pm ET by spicegirl1



    Edited 3/2/2008 3:24 pm ET by spicegirl1

    1. marye | | #2

      Yes, that is the pattern.

      I'm glad you'v tried this & know that it works...it made sense in my head but then not all of my ideas work out as I'd like them too.

      Thanks again, MaryElise

  2. jjgg | | #3

    I'm not sure I understand. Are you going to fuse the entire jacket with the knit interfacing and that is all that will be on the inside? It will show when you take it off,How are you finishing the seams? I did buy a jacket once that was not lined, had a front facing and then the rest was just fused. The seam allowances were serged. It was a wrap around top so it wasn't opened ever.

    1. marye | | #6

      The fabric is lightweight woven; color is a dark blue/black. When I hold it up to the light I can see through the weave a bit. I want to be able to wear it over a light-weight top but also as a jacket-blouse. When wearing over a top I probably wouldn't be taking it off as it would be part of the outfit (although I guess it’s possible). I was thinking of fusing the entire garment with a black knit interfacing & then serging all the seams. .. hope this makes sense.<!----><!----><!---->

  3. solosmocker | | #4

    If you don't want to line it, can you just interface the facings and hem and do a Hong Kong seam on the seam edges or serge the seam edges? That is how I just did a casual jacket. I have done a few jackets that I have entirely fused. After the first one I decided i did not like the additional stiffness in the sleeves. They weren't really stiff but they were heavier than they would have been with just a lining fabric. I used a knit tricot fusible. So in future fused jackets I just fused the body of the jacket, no sleeves. Just my personal opinion.

    solo

    1. marye | | #7

      I had also wondered about the sleeves but the fabric is so limp that I think it needs that all over extra stability. I’m also going to use a knit tricot fusible, black b/c the fabric is dark.

      Thank you for your personal opinion, that’s exactly what I need!

  4. starzoe | | #5

    Have you considered using Sandra Betzina's idea of making the front facing go all the way to the side seam? That way when the jacket is open it still looks finished and it does give the front more stability.

    1. marye | | #8

      I realized last night that it does have a full front facing so I may not need to fuse the front after all.

      1. jjgg | | #9

        You will still need to fuse the front, but not the front facing.I think this might work just fine, as long as you don't mind the interfacing showing. Good luck with your project

        1. marye | | #10

          After I last posted I thought more about fusing the front & I think you are right. The fabric will hang much smoother if the front is also fused.

          Thanks to everyone for the comments & encouragement. I’ve never posted anywhere before & this has been a great learning tool!

          1. sewelegant | | #11

            I would like to add a comment about what you are doing.  We have no sewing shows on TV where I live due to lack of interest (!)  However, one of my favorite people to watch in the past was Shirley Adams... The Sewing Connection.  I think she still has a show on PBS.  Anyway, she would always bring out the most unusual ideas and one I picked up on was turning a piece of limp silk into a wonderful jacket.  She fused the silk just like you have mentioned in your project, to change the "hand", so it would act more like the fabric needed to make a jacket.  In my recollection she then proceeded to make the jacket the same way as directed.  The key to her success was in making sure the fusing was permanent and would not separate later on in the wearing and care process.  Good luck.  I'm sure you are on the right track.

          2. marye | | #12

            I remember Shirley Adams...she was a favorite! I would get up early Saturday mornings with my VCR already programed to record, & watch with my hot tea, toast & fruit. Great memories, I'm glad you wrote. We don't get any PBS station here but I still have some scratchy videos of Shirley...this whole idea probably came from the archives in my brain of Shirley Adams. :)

          3. marye | | #13

            Oh, btw thanks for the tip about making sure the interfacing is fused securely I will make sure I check it.

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