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Walking foot advice

Tom_Dunlap | Posted in The Archives on

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Most of the sewing that I do is for gear that is used for climbing and camping. Typically I will be sewing through multiple layers of heavy nylon, seat belt webbing, and tubular webbing. I think that I have reached the limit of my Pfaff 332. I am looking for a heavier machine but have no idea what to look for in a bigger machine. I have been advised to look for a walking foot macine. The shops that I have gone to specialize in industrial and heavy duty machines. When I look at the machines I am flumuxed. I know that I don’t know enough to even ask any questions.

What should I be looking for? How big a motor? Brand? Special stitches?

I found this company on the web and the machine is sure a lot cheaper than the ones in the shops. Do you think this is worth looking into?

http://ecomm.fwi.com/fwistore/showdetl.cfm?&DID=16&Product_ID=2217&CATID=74

Any advice, or directions to imformation is appreciated.

Tom Dunlap

Replies

  1. Darlette | | #1

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    Tom, my advice is this: Take samples of the kind of fabrics you sew---multiple layers & all---in to the dealer when you do a "test drive." If you've got some heavy duty Schmetz needles (for sewing thru all those thick layers), take those too. Don't be afraid to adjust the tension on the machine. Less tension is required for thick layers of fabric. My advice to folks about buying stuff in general is this: When you KNOW what you're doing & need little help, then you CAN AFFORD to buy STRICTLY on PRICE. Now, when you need some help, then SERVICE becomes real important to ya'. And you gotta pay for that service, which is generally reflected in a higher COST. Kind of an inverse relationship working there. Don't cheat yourself. Buy what you NEED. Take your samples. Sew on the given machine until you feel comfortable. Then IF you need service, PAY for it & live happily ever after. THE END. :-)) Darlette

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