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How-to

Sewing Tip: Block-Fuse Interfacing to Facings

Threads magazine - 177 - Feb./Mar. 2015 Issue
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This tip was originally featured in Threads #177 (February/March 2015).

Instead of cutting fusible interfacing pieces and attempting to match them to cut facings, I’ve found it’s easier to block-fuse the interfacing to the cut facings. But how do you do this without fusing everything to your ironing board or ruining your iron? This is how:

Cut the facings from fashion fabric. Smooth a sheet of interfacing, fusible side up, on the ironing board. Place the cut facings right side up on top of the interfacing; arrange them for grain or stretch and to conserve the interfacing.

Tear off from a roll several sheets of paper towels, still attached to each other so you have a single long piece. Lay the paper towel piece on top of the facings and interfacing.

Press as directed by the interfacing instructions, through the paper towels. Cut the fused facings from the excess paper towel and interfacing. The paper towel falls away, leaving only the interfacing fused to the fabric facings.

Avoid using printed paper towels because the ink designs can transfer to the fabric. Alternatively, use tissue paper, typing paper, or kraft paper instead of paper towels.

By Sarah McFarland, Threads Editor

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  1. MsUm June 11th

    I agree with bmck97004 ... Teflon sheets instead of paper towels. I'm also a miser with my interfacings, so cutting away even small pieces seems wasteful. The little bits always come in handy somewhere.

  2. bmck97004 December 18th

    Instead of wasting paper for this technique (save our trees...) use a non-stick teflon pressing sheet. They are inexpensive and can be used indefinitely.

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