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Finding the grain line

tpel91 | Posted in Patterns on

I have a new to me pattern that I’d like to use. But it lacks the grainline markings that I’m accustomed to having on the commercial patterns I would normally buy. Somewhere and some when, I read an article about how to find and mark the proper grainline. But my memory isn’t specific enoughas to how to do it or where I found that article. Anyone have any tips for how to mark my new pattern so it has proper grain lines?

Replies

  1. HeartFire | | #1

    What type of pattern is it? for a top, the center front and back would normally be on the straight grain, if it has princess side pieces or a side panel, essentially you fold the piece in half matching the bottom corners (if they are level) and get a grain line
    if you have different pieces let me know
    Judy

    1. tpel91 | | #2

      It is for a jacket and none of the pattern pieces has much of a straight or level line. Princess seams would come closest to describing the style.I think I'll wind up analysing each piece to figure out the highest point of each one and go from there. I was just hoping to come up with something more of a method to apply to the problem rather than 'guesstimating'.

      1. HeartFire | | #3

        are there any markings on the pieces?
        for the jacket front, the center front is on the straight grain, is there markings for button? that would be a grain line. The centyer back would b e on grian, but if it has a seam in the center back it amy be curved to fit the back a little.
        If there is a waist line marked on any piece, you could go and just draw a line at a 90* angle from it. For the side panel, there shold be a dot where the underarm notch is and the grian line would be straight down from that - fold the piece in half on that notch so it loooks like it is folded neatly in half - if the grain is off a tiny bit it won't really matter - unless you are doing a plaid or other patterned fabric. The same for the sleeve, if it is a one piece sleeve, fold it in half to match the points where the underarm seam ends at the underarm, (the bicep line) that will give you the grainline (the fold)
        hope this helps,
        Whos pattern is this that came without any grain lines?
        Judy

        1. tpel91 | | #4

          It isn't a commercial pattern in the normal sense. Off-hand I'm not sure of the publisher for it and I don't have it at hand at the moment so I'll have to add that bit of information later. It is for a costume from a TV series. I suspect it was originally drawn by the costumer for the show; at least the markings seem to indicate that. Some one got a hold of appropriate permissions and printed it up for sale. I'm thinking to make the jacket up in a denim to see how to make the pattern work for me. I'm a reasonably good home sewer and do a fair amount of reading on the subject, but have never taken much in the way of classes or education. Drafting my own pattern is beyond my skills. And I liked the style so... Now I'm trying to convince myself I'm not in over my head. I remind myself that the best way I've ever learned anything about sewing was to dive into a project slightly tougher than my skills:) I needed the pattern to get the shapes, proportions and sizes right. Now if I can just add the grain lines I'll be good to go.Using the center front and center back would be a place to start. Then laying out the remaining pieces around those and draw parallel lines. This sounds like it might work a bit better than my first thoughts. Your idea for the sleeves would work - but it is a 2-piece sleeve too. The good news is that there are a couple of smaller pieces that get cut on the fold of the fabric. That provides a couple more clues to follow.

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