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A Handy Chart of Fusible and Sew-in Interfacings

Photo: Scott Phillips

by Ann Steeves
An Online Extra to Threads #123

In the Basics column in the February/March 2006 issue of Threads (#123), I explain why fusible interfacing—fabric with beads of adhesive on one side that can be melted with an iron—helps strengthen your fashion fabric. I also demonstrate how to cut, position, and apply it.

The application process is very straightforward, but the interfacing sections of local fabric stores can be overwhelming because there are so many different types and thicknesses. This handy chart, excerpted from Denise L. Bean's article "Interfacing: The Inside Essential" in the October/November 2002 issue of Threads (#103), breaks the choices down into three main types (woven, nonwoven, and knit), then in terms of thicknesses. Print out a copy and store it in your purse. The next time you approach a wall of interfacing, you'll quickly be able to select an appropriate product.

Interfacing brands and their products
Four major brands of interfacing are available to consumers: Stacy, Pellon, and HTC, Inc. are available at most fabric stores, and Kuffner is available from tailoring suppliers and some independent fabric stores. If you purchase a nonbrand interfacing and can’t locate the manufacturer, the retailer should stand behind the product.
 
 Key  
featherweight to lightweight
lightweight to medium-weight
medium-weight to heavyweight

* miscellaneous or nonbrand interfacings

** specifically for hand or 
machine knits, hand wovens, and loose weaves
Fusible interfacings
Woven Non-woven Knit
Bi-Stretch Lite—low-temp stretch woven (Pellon)
Touch O' Gold—low-temp plain woven (HTC)
Flex Weave—stretch woven (HTC)
Hair Canvas/Hymo*
Kuffner Woven—plain woven (Kuffner)
Satin Weave—plain woven (HTC)
Shape-Flex—plain woven (Stacy)
Wigan*
Armo Rite—plain woven (HTC)
Form-Flex All Purpose—plain woven (HTC)
Form-Flex—plain woven 50/50 (HTC)
Fusible Acro—hair canvas (HTC)
#906F Fusible—crosswise stretch (Pellon)
Designer's Sheer—crosswise stretch (Pellon)
Sheer D'Light Featherweight—crosswise stretch (HTC)
Sheer D'Light Lightweight—crosswise stretch (HTC)
Sof-Shape—crosswise stretch (Pellon)
#911FF Fusible—stable (Pellon)
Designer's Lite—crosswise stretch (Pellon)
Easy Shaper—stable (Pellon)
Form-Flex Nonwoven—stable (HTC)
Fusi-Form Lightweight—crosswise stretch (HTC)
Sheer D'Light Mediumweight—crosswise stretch (HTC)
ShirTailor—stable; for collars, cuffs, or waistbands (Pellon)
Shirt-Shaper—stable (HTC)
Softouch—low-temp; crosswise stretch (HTC)
Tailor's Elite—stitch-reinforced (Pellon)
#931TD Fusible—crosswise stretch (Pellon)
Armo Fusi-Form—crosswise stretch (HTC)
Pel-Aire—stable (Pellon)
Tailor's Touch—stable (Pellon)
EasyKnit—tricot (Stacy)
Feather Weft—weft-insertion (HTC)
So-Sheer—tricot (HTC)
Delicate Warp*—warp-insertion
Delicate Weft*—weft-insertion
Fusi-Knit—tricot** (HTC)
Kuffner Weft—weft-insertion (Kuffner)
Sofbrush—low-temp; warp-insertion (HTC)
Sofknit—low-temp; tri-dimensional (HTC)
Textured Weft**—weft-insertion (HTC)
Ultra Weft—weft-insertion (Pellon)
Whisper Weft—weft-insertion (HTC)
Armo Weft—weft-insertion (HTC)
     
Sew-in interfacings
Woven Non-woven Knit
Armo Press Firm—plain woven (HTC)
Armo Press Soft—plain woven (HTC)
Collar Canvas*
Form-Flex Woven—plain woven (HTC)
Hair Canvas/Hymo*
Hair Cloth*
Sta-Form Durable Press—plain woven (HTC)
Veri-Shape Durable Press—plain woven (HTC)
Acro—hair canvas (HTC)
Buckram*
Crinoline*
Netting*
Tailor's Pride—hair canvas (HTC)
Wigan*
#905 Sew-in—crosswise stretch (Pellon)
Intra-Face Bias Featherweight—all bias (HTC)
Intra-Face Lightweight—crosswise stretch (HTC)
Sew-Shape Featherweight—stable (HTC)
#910 Sew-in—all-bias (Pellon)
Intra-Face Bias Lightweight—all-bias (HTC)
Intra-Face Mediumweight—stable (HTC)
#930 Sew-in—all-bias (Pellon)
HTC Intra-Face Durable Press—crosswise stretch (HTC)
HTC Intra-Face Heavyweight—stable (HTC)
Sewin' Sheer—tricot (HTC)


Ann Steeves teaches sewing classes in the Boston area, and sews unique accessories (www.gorgeousfabrics.com).

ThreadsMagazine Threads Magazine, editor
Posted on Nov 18th, 2008 in online extras, tools & supplies, notions, interfacing

Comments (1)

EdwardThirlwall EdwardThirlwall writes: Wow, that is a truly comprehensive set of fabrics and accessories for us to explore with. I wonder how sewists store their extensive collection of fabrics and threads without losing any single one of them. I can visualize many of them using a number of different-sized storage bins and drawers for each individual type of cloth on top of the needles and threads. I would love to see those storage solutions if any of you readers have got to share.
Posted: 10:37 pm on January 16th

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