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HELP!!! Military Tailoring of Shirts

Hollie_Reno | Posted in The Archives on

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I hope someone can help me:
I need to tailor plain workshirts with a “Military Tailor”.
I believe it means sewing two seams up the front over the pockets and Three seems up the back, but I need a diagram and/or detailed directions, to do it correctly.

CAN ANYONE HELP ME, PLEASE!!!!!

Replies

  1. Véronik_Avery | | #1

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    Hollie,

    will this be a modern military
    tailored shirt? What springs to mind are tabs at the shoulders and pleated
    pockets with a buttoned flap. I do have a book called 'Battledress' but
    only entire uniforms are pictured and the shirts are obscured. I did find
    a couple of things of interest on a web search of Army/Navy stores; here
    are a few examples:

    View Image

    <http://www.gen-ex-tech.com/secure/dropzone/show_products.cfm?headingid=87&catid=43&depth=1
    >

     

    <http://www.imsplus.com/ims58.html>

     

    Good luck!

    1. Stephanie_Corina_Goddard | | #2

      *Well, Hollie, back in the 1970's, I was one of the first female police officers in Northern Virginia. Many of my co-workers on the force preferred what was called a "military press" to their uniform shirts. It's simple: each front is folded in half (from shoulder to hem) by aligning the center front opening with the side seam. A vertical crease is pressed into the cloth. On the back, first the shirt is folded in half at the center back and pressed, excluding the yoke. Then, the CB press line is aligned with each side seam and the shirt is pressed again (don't press the yoke). Voila - two creases in shirt front and three in back. If you are making the shirts, you'll want to edge-stitch the creases in place during construction. Makes it a piece of cake for the person doing the ironing (ask me how I know!)

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