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Ironing board with storage under

Marion_ | Posted in The Archives on

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I’ve had a hard time organizing my sewing space because I couldn’t firure out a good way to store all those bulky ironing accessories and still have them in easy reach with my ironing board right behind my sewing machine. I finally hit upon the idea of using a long two-shelf bookcase to which I plan to attach a board which will overlap the edges and which I will pad like an ironing board. Does anyone have any points I should consider? Would particle board do for the top, and what kind of padding would be best?

Replies

  1. Steve_P | | #1

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    I did this and it works great. Except I added a 1/2" layer of Homosote board on top before covering everything with a a layer of cotton batting and a good heavy cotton twill cloth. With the Homosote, I can also use my "ironing board" as a pinning board.

    Homosote is available in various thicknesses and is usually sold in 4' X 8' sheets, although our local lumber yard sells smaller sizes because it makes great inexpensive bulletin boards.

    I paid about $20 for a 1/2"X4'X8' sheet.

    Cheers!!

    Steve P
    Minneapolis

    1. Diane | | #2

      *More storage is always a great idea. The only problem I see with your plan is that it might make it difficult to press skirts and dresses that need to go around the board. How far would the board extend beyond the bookcase?

      1. Marion_ | | #3

        *Steve, did you use particle board under the Homosote for support, or was it used alone? Great idea to be able to use for a pinning board also. Diane, I've thought of the problem of not being able to slip a skirt over the end. Right now, I plan to extend the board over the back edge one inch so I can staple on the padding; 6 inches extension over the front edge so I can get my knees under it (it will be at sitting height); and about 14 inches at the left end for skirts, which I may decide to put on hinges so I can fold it down.

        1. Steve_P | | #4

          *Marion - I covered my homosote board separate from the countertop so I can stand up the homosote board and use it as a vertical pin board (or bulletin board) and still have a horizontal surface to work on.Homosote is not very strong, but if your bookcases have a top to support the homosote, and if you're not going to let it overhange very far (6" is OK), you wouldn't need the particle board. On the other hand, using a separate piece of particle board would give you a good work surface if you wanted to use the homosote in a verticle position.Steve PMinneapolis

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