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Quilting Garments with Scuba Knit

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Allow me to share my recent experience of quilting a jacket using scuba knit and explain how you, too, can quilt with scuba knit.

First, I confess that I have an obsession with making jackets. These days, I am focused on the moto style. I’m not sure if it’s all the details on them that hold my attention, or if it’s the precision required for constructing them—or both.

Choosing the fabric

The search for fabric with which to make my first moto jacket started in my favorite fabric store, Gail K Fabrics in Atlanta. I wanted a combination of tweed and something else, maybe leather, faux leather, or suede. I chose faux suede to cut down on the dry cleaning bills later. One of the store’s staff recommended scuba knit as a backing for the quilted sections of the sleeves and yokes, in place of batting. She noted that some designers who frequent the shop had been using it for that purpose. I decided to try it, too, and I loved the results.

The scuba knit I bought has a lightweight jersey on either side, with a thin layer of foam in between.

Scuba knit
The purchased scuba knit has a thin layer of foam sandwiched between two layers of lightweight jersey knit.
Scuba knit, back side
Back of the scuba knit piece

The pattern pieces to be quilted were the upper sleeve and yoke sections, as shown in the illustrations of the Ziggi Biker Jacket from Style Arc.

Moto jacket pattern envelope
Pattern package
Upper sleeve and yoke pattern pieces lying on cutting mat
The moto jacket’s upper sleeve and yoke pieces will be cut from quilted fabric.

You can follow the method I used to quilt my jacket for nearly any garment using scuba knit.

Prepare the fabrics to be quilted

1. Cut sections from the fabric to be quilted, making sure…

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Next: How to Sew Wool Double-Knit Applique
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  1. nachodog | | #1

    Such a cool jacket Pam! Regards, Deedee Tucker

    1. User avater
      pamhoward | | #2

      Hi Deedee! Thanks so much😊 It was fun to make, Hope all is well with you!

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Sewing With Knits

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