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bias skirts

JanM21 | Posted in General Discussion on

I am somewhat new to the computer and designing clothes, having
learned what I know over 50 years ago from my mother — but
here goes. I do spend a lot of time in high end stores
examining the techniques of the big designers, and have found
a way to take about 50 pounds off my figure by doing what I
call an Armani cut on my bias skirts.

I use denim mostly, but a drapier fabric or slinky would work
really well – measure around the largest part of my hips,
cut a bias skirt pattern in the shape of a long narrow box,
shape the top around the waistline -(this can be done on the
serger when finishing the skirt) – hold the pattern up and
mark at the knee – lay the pattern back on the table and
add four inches on each side from the knee to the hem (flaring
out from the knee.

Cut the front and back the same pattern – serge or sew up
the side seams and sew an elastic around the waist (the last
skirt I made was from lightweight denim, and I didn”t hem
the bottom – just let it fringe – It looks great. casual
fun to make – you can tighten up the side seams as much
as you like, and the way this hangs is perfectly great!

Just wanted to share this with all of you – I do cut my
bias all going the same direction (as though it had a nap)
it seems to drape better.

Jan

Replies

  1. peppi | | #1

    Jan,

    I love the sound of this skirt from denim.  I'm having trouble understanding the flaring out from the knee.

    Do I understand right, that the four inches on each side from the knee to the hem is in length?

     If so how far out do you flare from the straight side?

    I'm wanting to whip this thing out for this fall, especially the fringe part.  Thank you for a wonderful idea.

    Max from Colorado

    1. JanM21 | | #3

      Hi, Max

      On the perfectly straight skirt, mark on the seamline right at the

      knee, take a ruler and gradually flare the skirt from the seamline

      to an extra four inches in width at the hemline. I would draw

      a picture for you, but I can't figure out how to do it on this

      computer. Do this on both sides of the skirt. Most bias skirts

      are a-line and flared from the waist. This is only flared from

      the knee. The material also needs to be fluid enough to hang right,

      soft weight, but strong, so the seams won't pop when they stretch

      as you sit. Hope this helps.

      Jan

  2. enidshapiro | | #2

    When you say a long narrow box, do you mean that you cut out a rectangle on the bias, the size of your hips, then from the knee on measure out four inches on each side and taper out from there?  Doesn't this then look like a straight skirt that flares out at the bottom, like a trumpet skirt?  Love to see a picture of it. 

    1. JanM21 | | #4

      Enid - Yes, that's exactly what I was trying to say. My skirts

      are ankle length, I have about four, and they take about an hour

      to whiz up. I cut my seam allowances about an inch to l l/2 inches

      wide, even wider of the fabric is slinky, because the bias stretches. It skinnies up, if you know what I mean.

      The hemline is the most important part of the skirt. After sewing

      up the side seams, I put a piece of elastic around the waist and

      start fitting.

      Do all the

      fitting from the waistline, pulling the fabric under the elastic

      until the hemline looks good. I usually just sew it to the elastic

      that I use for fitting.

      The next time my grandchildren visit, I will have them help me put

      a picture or drawing of this skirt on Gatherings for me. I am

      not really savvy about how to do all that.

      Jan P.S. I saw one in Sax in St. Louis made of blue chambray.

      Also another one in Cleveland made of a lightweight linen with a

      tunic top. I made mine out of lightweight denim and a rayon knit.

      1. Jean | | #5

        Sounds very interesting. Can you post a photo? (or send me one so I can post it for you?)

        1. BUNZINO | | #7

          Jan,

          Do you think this would hide a huge tummy? Usually bias skirts emphasize it, so I stay away fr them.

          Nance

          1. JanM21 | | #8

            Hi - yes, this skirt looks really good with a long tunic, that

            hangs below the tummy - a friend of mine has it in a large woman's

            size with a tunic to match, soft blue linen - it is so beautiful.

            We have had a lot of fun with this pattern. Jan

        2. JanM21 | | #9

          Jean - yes, would be happy to send you a photo, it will take me

          a few days to get them taken and developed - we will take several -

          let me know where to send them = Jan

          1. Jean | | #10

            OK, email with addie on the way to you. :)

          2. Jean | | #12

            Here are the photos that Jan sent to me.

            Thanks, Jan.

            Edited 10/7/2002 3:34:34 PM ET by Jean

      2. peppi | | #6

        Jan,     Thanks so much for your response.  I think you did well in your explanation.  I haven't posted pics yet, either. 

        I'm saving up my brain power so I'll be ready when my son decides to teach me.  He's usually very brief and I if I miss a word he says, he'll give me time to figure it out on my own and if I can't, I'm very appreciative when he has time to repeat himself.  LOL  Otherwise, he thinks I abuse the privilege of having him living with us.  LOL

  3. eli_thomas | | #11

    Could you post this on PatternReview?  ( http://www.patternreview.com )  I think the people there would really like to know how to make this kind of skirt.

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