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Using tricot to line knit top

user-228485 | Posted in Fabric and Trim on

Hey all. 

I have a pattern for a v-neck knit top which has facings for the neck and arms.  I want to use a boucle fabric to make the knit top, and facings would look weird on it.  I wondered if it would work to use a nylon tricot as a lining for the top, instead of using the facings.  I’ve seen Sandra Betzina make reversible tops on TV and I just wondered if tricot was a suitable fabric for this.  I tried to make one of these tops using the facings, and it just looked stupid.  Too much bulk in the seams.  I got frustrated and threw it away!

Thanx,

Cindy

Replies

  1. Theodora | | #1

    It probably would work fine. It depends on how much you want to feel like you are wearing saran wrap, though, and how hot it is where you are. Evaluate your own personal memories of nylon tricot slips and your tolerance of nylon camisoles, and base it partly on that.

    More seriously, I think the lying is a great idea, but you would have to compare your boucle and your lining choices for weight and draping qualities. Might the nylon sag more than the knit? Laundering considerations, etc.

    You're right, you will have less bulk in the seams, and you won't have that nasty facing peeking out problem. I can't think when I last put facings in armholes on sleeveless garments. But look around at all the lightweight knits that might be good possibilities. What is the fiber content of your boucle? Could a very lightweight cotton knit be compatible?

    Another option is to use your tricot or another knit to make a narrow binding, instead of a full lining.

    1. user-228485 | | #2

      Yeah I live in Florida (hot hot hot) and probably would sweat to death.  I have seen tops ready to wear in stores that line the tops just in the front which solves the facing problem for the front of the neck and armholes, but the back has to be folded down and stitched (and i dont have a coverstitch on my serger). 

      Where can I find a cooler lightweight knit that is as lightweight as tricot but wouldnt be as hot?  All ive ever seen is jersey, and thats too bulky for what I need it for.

      Cindy

      1. NansiM | | #3

        Cindy,

           What about a light cotton singleknit--like the kind you see in lightweight pj's or even your basic undies.  Or you might even check some lingerie fabrics-they seem to be going to more natural or microfibers which will keep you cool.  i think malden Mills (the polarfleece people) were putting out some lightweight stuff that was stretch knit and had great "wicking" ability.  Let us know what you decide!

      2. SewingSue | | #4

        Cindy,  I also live in Florida and agree it's hot, hot, hot.  You want to get rid of as much bulk as possible.  I agree with the other recommendation of using narrow binding.  Keep things cool and simple.

        I live in the Gainesville area.  Where in Florida do you live?  Sorry about changing the topic.

        Sue

        1. user-228485 | | #5

          Im from Orlando.  I have a difficulty with narrow bindings.  Does anyone have an easy way to do this?  What should I use for the binding? 

          PS I love Gainesville, I used to go to Shands hospital all the time to see my orthopaedic surgeon when I was a kid.  I have scoliosis.

          1. SewingSue | | #6

            Cindy,

            Orlando, practically neighbors.  What you use for binding really depends on the project.  If the neck opening is sufficiently large enough that you don't need the neck to stretch to go over your head you could really get away with anything you'd like.  I recently purchased a top from mail order.  I thought the neck opening was narrow binding on closer look it was really more like a narrow facing stitched in place.  I was rather taken with the look and attempted a recreation.  I was making a pullover top from cotton french terry.  What I did was cut a strip of fabric on the cross grain 1" wide and used the the serger's differential setting to gather the strip slightly.  This made it fit around the curve really nice.  I trimmed the seam allowance on the top to 1/4 inch and stitched with a 1/4 inch seam allowance.  Next time I will do the same but with a strip that is 1-1/4" wide.  The strip was a little to narrow to turn under easily.  Another option I thought of would be to either pre-mark the amount I want turned under or possibly to serge the other side without differential so it would just be straight without gathers.  I think if I had either marked or serged what I wanted turned under it would have been smoother working with.  However, the final result was very nice and I was pleased with the look and will repeat this again with a little modification.  The results are a little sporty but clean and neat.

            I also thought that if you were working with a fairly light weight fabric it would be possible to fold the strip in half lengthwise and serge the raw edges with the differential and stitch down the folded edge.  This would eliminate turning under such a narrow edge.  Depending on the fabric, you could use the cross grain or do bias.

            More traditionally, narrow bindings are done with bias strips.  Trim the edge to be finished to about a 1/4" seam allowance.  Depending on bias strips and fabric of project use either single layer or folded bias strip.  Stitch with a 1/4" seam allowance and fold bias over the edge towards the back.  If using single layer turn under a narrow seam allowance so the back is slightly wider than the front and stitch in the ditch from the front.  If using folded bias strip, simply fold over the edge towards the back and stitch in the ditch.  If I am after a finer finish I will finish the back by stitching with tiny hand stitches.

            I don't like the look of V necks on myself so I can't really advise you on mitering.  I prefer curve necklines for myself and always convert V necks to curves.  I have seen binding done with what appears to be similiar to bathing suit fabric very stretch almost like elastic and comes in lots of colors.  I haven't tried using that yet.  But would think it should make very nice binding and should mold pretty easy without twisting or warping.  Also elastic with a picot edge can be used.  Many options.  Hope I haven't overwhelmed you and this is helpful.

            Sue

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