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DIY Lego Zombie Minifigure

This is my son in his Lego zombie minifigure costume next to his zombie little sister at the annual Denver Zombie Crawl.
Here is my Lego zombie son with his mime zombie mom who is eating his Lego minifigure face.
My son in his Lego zombie costume, minus the head.
In progress test fitting.
My son with his new zombie costume. The costume is sturdy and freestanding when not being worn. After Halloween my son wants to keep the Lego zombie costume in his room next to his table where he plays Legos.Next Halloween, I owe my daughter an elaborate DIY costume.
This is my son in his Lego zombie minifigure costume next to his zombie little sister at the annual Denver Zombie Crawl.

This is my son in his Lego zombie minifigure costume next to his zombie little sister at the annual Denver Zombie Crawl.

My son wanted to be a Lego man minifigure for Halloween. Our family participates in the annual Denver Zombie Crawl every year, so he and I determined it might be fun if he was a Lego zombie. The annual event draws thousands of people to downtown Denver, and this year we were swarmed due to the popularity of his costume.

It was important to have the costume as proportionately correct to a real Lego minifigure as possible, with the correct approximate movements to the toy. The feet are slightly elevated off the ground for safety while walking and trick-or-treating.

You can see how the costume moves in this home video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY0ZDMiLjbI

The costume was fabricated primarily out of foam rubber, hot glue and latex paint. The head is a combination of a styrofoam wreath split down the middle, foam rubber and automotive window tint so that he could see out of it. The face also has a removable "normal" face. The inside of the costume is held together with velcro and nylon webbing. I had to hand sew the velcro to the webbing because I am without a sewing machine. My family does many costume events with a variety of costuming clubs however, I either have to borrow a sewing machine or have a friend sew items based on my designs/requests. Winning a serger would be a huge boost to my creative opportunities as a costume hobbyist.

This costume cost less than $100 to create, with the primary expense being the cost of paint. The foam rubber is from rolls of padding for camping at a cost of about $8 per roll. I chose foam rubber because it's lightweight and holds a shape very well.  It can also be slightly molded with heat, as seen in the arms.


Pattern or design used: My own design

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