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Conversational Threads

Accessories for a Serger

MargaretAnn | Posted in Equipment and Supplies on

Dear Wise ones.

I am very happy with my new Viking Serger 905.  As I am not a professional, and sew mostly clothing and things for our home, I am reluctant to invest in huge quantities of cone threads.  In Clotilde, they show two gadgets.  One uses wound bobbins to supply thread, and the other claims to make it possible to wind almost any threads onto spools and then use those, making it possible to use only one cone.  Has anyone any experience with either one, or with other better items? Advice would be welcome.  (I do not sew baby or childrens clothes.)

Margaret-Ann

Replies

  1. carolfresia | | #1

    Hi, Margaret-Ann,

    You don't have to use cone thread on a serger. Pamela Busque, one of our authors and an excellent serger teacher, suggests that you buy cones of just a few colors, and rely on "color blending" rather than exact matching. I own white, off-white, a middle-tone gray, black, navy, and red, and find that this is sufficient for just about any serging I do. I probably don't need both white AND off-white, or black AND navy, actually. Use red for any reds, oranges, or pinks, grey for middle-range blues and greens, off-white or white for any pastel or pale neutrals, navy for dark blues, purples and greens, and black for black or dark grays, purples....etc. 

    Of course, you can also just use regular old sewing thread on the serger, and I sometimes do that if I want a more precise match for a particular garment, or if the serging will be visible from the outside. My favorite compromise is to use a matching sewing thread in the needle(s), and whatever cone thread I have that blends best in the loopers. That way, if the stitches happen to show at a seamline (they shouldn't, of course, if the needle thread tension is set properly), they won't be too obvious.

    Cone thread lasts a long time, so it's worth investing in good-quality thread. Make sure it's not fuzzy or lumpy-looking--excess lintiness or an uneven texture can really give you a tension (ha! ha!) headache. Dark colors are the worst culprits, so splurge on good stuff for your cones of black and navy.

    Carol

    1. MargaretAnn | | #2

      Thanks, Carol.  That is very helpful.  I know from other experience that good thread more than pays for itself.  So do you think the gadgets I mentioned are not needed?

      Margaret-Ann

      1. carolfresia | | #3

        I'm not familiar with the tools you mentioned, so I can't really say. I don't think I've ever felt I needed anything more than regular cones or spools for my serger, but that doesn't mean that those gadgets wouldn't make my life a lot easier if I had them! Anyone else have experiences with them?

        Carol

        1. sueb | | #4

          I own the same viking serger.  I use both cone threads and regular threads in it all the time, sometimes using both at the same time.  I don't rewind the regular machine threads onto any bobbins.  I just put them on the cone holder and then use the plastic disks that came with the machine to hold the spool in place.   I usually use the cone threads for the loopers and the spool threads for the needles.

          sueb

          http://www.sueboriginals.com

          1. MargaretAnn | | #5

            Dear Sue

            So I don't need that bobbin gadget at all!  Thanks.

            Margaret-Ann

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