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Conversational Threads

Plumbing Side Seams on Test Pants

fearyenot | Posted in Fitting on

Hi:

I see my pant side seams are at least an inch “off plumb”  below the waist, less so near the knee and then “off plumb” closer to the hemline (about 1/2 inch).   I haven’t checked center back and center front yet.  My questions are, once I mark the test pants where the plumb line hangs, what do I do next? To transfer the changes to my paper pattern, do I cut along the plumb line markings?  Are the markings considered my new side seams?  If so, then do I add my seam allowance?

Help!

Thanks,

Anne

Replies

  1. suesew | | #1

    You didn't say which direction they were off plumb. If they are pulling forward, your body is demanding morre room across the front. I would add to the side front edges so that the seam would then hang straight at the side. Patterns are often a little bigger across the back when that is just the oposite of many of our bodies. If you truly have cut the leg on the straight of grain you should be able to "read" what is happening to the hang just by looking to see which way it is being pulled. Isn't fitting fun?

    1. mygaley | | #2

      I thought you might enjoy hearing about one of my alterations customers:
      a well-to-do young man who wears custom suits and imported shirts. Because of his extremely broad shoulders and narrow waist and hips, anything rtw must be altered. One day he brought some shirts and he had one of his fabulous suits with him--something was wrong with the cuffs/hems on all his suits. When he had them on, I could see immediately from the side seam that the problem was in his back waist.
      I talked to him about his exercise regimen and yes, he was doing some things differently; his behind was more muscular than it was and therefore smaller. I removed the back waist band and l/2 way to the cf and raised up the CB 3/4" tapering to nothing in front of the side seams. Now his cuffs hang straight and he thinks I'm a genius AND I LEARNED HOW TO DO IT FROM GATHERINGS. Thanks to you all. Galey

    2. fearyenot | | #3

      HI:

      Thanks for your response.  Well, I'm seeing the need to plumb the left and right side seams are different as night and day.  The left needs a lot more adjusting than the right.  I can provide more details later.  

      I'm wide and flat at the hip and seat with slender legs.  As I eye the plumb line so it  bisects me from the side view, I've found standing on a measuring tape, the plumb line rests on the floor just under 5" away the side of my foot. ( My foots on the measuring tape and the plumb line rests on the measuring tape.)  This means the plumb line hangs from my hip and as it travels past my lower calf and ankle, it is 5" away from me.  If the plumb line hangs so far away from the pants, how do I go about marking it?  How do I keep the plumb line from moving?  I know I need a helper to do this.  My helper knows less than I do and we're stumped!

      I'm looking forward to your response.

      Thanks again.

      Anne

      1. SewNancy | | #4

        I have a very flat seat and have had your problem. I have tried every method under the sun, including the one Kenneth King shows in his pants book. Well, the easiest and best solution I have found has nothing to do with plumbing the side, it is the Threads 2 series article on body space. The pants hang from the broadest part of your body and that is where you have to start. They will hang off grain if you don't have them fitted at the hip correctly. When you make a muslin, draw or sew in the hip, crotch and grain line so that you can more easily see where the distortion is. Take a look at these articles and see if they don't work for you.
        Nancy

        1. fearyenot | | #5

          Hi:

          Thank you so much for this information.  I'm hopeful this will help.

          As for now, I need some more information from you.  I've looked around on the Threads web site and haven't been able to find the Threads 2 series article on body space.  Could you please provide information exactly where I can find that?

          Thank you again!

           

          Anne

          1. SewNancy | | #6

            The articles are by Joyce Murphy and they are in #119 june JUly 2005 and 122, January 2006. Try the library or see if they are available as back issues. When you make your muslin, make sure you cut your side seams at 1 1/2 " so that you can let them out if you take in a lot at the center. It is the easiest, but most counter intuitive method I have seen and I have been on the quest for perfect fitted pants for years.
            Good luck,
            Nancy

          2. fearyenot | | #7

            Hi Nancy:

            Thank you so much for sharing this information with me.  I did find both issues at the library and reviewed them before I went to bed last night.  I'm really excited about the progress I can make with this new information. I'm looking to buy the plastic-covered metal rule used to determine the body space.  I've often thought there has to be a way to duplicate  my overall crotch curve (length) but couldn't figure out how to do it. 

            I really appreciate you!

            Thank you again!

            Anne Audette

             

  2. SkiNsew | | #8

    Joyce Murphy also appeared on the Sew Much More show that is on the DIY network.  She demonstrated her technique for pants fitting.  Here is an URL that has detail about the show and may help with the information in the Threads article.

    http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/shows_smm/episode/0,2046,DIY_14336_26547,00.html

    The show number was SMM237.

    Mary



    Edited 3/15/2006 7:44 am ET by skiNsew

    1. fearyenot | | #9

      Thanks, Mary!  I'm printing out the information as I write to you.  I bought the flexible curve... I'm on my way!

       

      Thanks again.

      Anne

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