Save Your Fabric from Pulls and Snags - Threads


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Save Your Fabric from Pulls and Snags

What do you do when disaster strikes in the sewing room? Scorches, spills, and rips happen to us all, and it doesn't have to end in tears. 

In the new Spring 2013 issue of SewStylish, we share some of sewing expert Barbara Deckert's best rescue techinques to salvage sewing projects. Barbara wrote a whole book on the topic, Sewing 911: Practical and Creative Rescues for Sewing Emergencies (Taunton Press, 2001). 

Here's an extra solution we saved for online: What to do when you run into a snag.

Pulls and snags

Pulls on woven fabrics occur when one thread gets caught on something and forms what looks like a line across the fabric. You can often stroke them out with a fingernail. Snags on knits need to be pulled inside of the garment to avoid unraveling. Do not clip them, or you may end up with holes.

Solution 1: The "knit picker"

A knit picker is an itty-bitty latch hook available from sewing-supply stores and notions catalogs. To use one, insert the hook from the wrong side of the garment, hook the snag, close the latch, and gently pull the snag to the wrong side of the garment. Rub the right side of the area with your fingernail to smooth. 

Solution 2: Needle and thread

Insert the threaded, eye end of a needle from the wrong side of the garment through the base of the snag. Manipulate the snag into the loop formed by the eye end of the needle and the thread, then grasp both the needle and thread underneath, and pull the snag to the wrong side.

What's your favorite save?

Pick up the Spring 2013 issue of SewStylish and check out Barbara's other tips, for everything from removing an oil stain to sanding out a scorch mark. 

Have you discovered any sewing room saves on your own?

What did you do when confronted with a sewing catastrophe?

Have you tried any of these tricks already?

Let us know what you think!

Comments (2)

Mamato8 Mamato8 writes: For bringing a snag to the back, I use a cheap needle threader poked through from the wrong side. If I'm wearing the article, I can poke through the right side far away from the snag , then up through the snag as before, so it ends up in the back anyway. I have used the needle and thread method too.
Posted: 6:41 pm on September 23rd

GypsyStrong GypsyStrong writes: If I prick my finger and get a little blood on the fabric, it might sound icky but this works every time. Lick it and suck out the blood! Your own saliva dissolves your own blood better than soap and water.
Posted: 6:20 pm on February 7th

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