How to Make Fortuny-Style Beaded Edges - Threads

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How to Make Fortuny-Style Beaded Edges

This dress features three hand-sewn beaded treatments–brick-stitched, picot-stitched, and whipstitched. Here, we show you how to whipstich a beaded edge. Be sure to pick up Threads #172 (April/May 2014) for all three methods. 
A Fortuny-style edge can be created using any bead style or size, and can be applied with a variety of materials, such as ribbon, buttonhole twist, or thread.
This dress features three hand-sewn beaded treatments–brick-stitched, picot-stitched, and whipstitched. Here, we show you how to whipstich a beaded edge. Be sure to pick up Threads #172 (April/May 2014) for all three methods. 

This dress features three hand-sewn beaded treatments–brick-stitched, picot-stitched, and whipstitched. Here, we show you how to whipstich a beaded edge. Be sure to pick up Threads #172 (April/May 2014) for all three methods. 

Photo: Jack Deutsch

Ruth Ciemnoczolowski's technique, excerpted from "Embellishments: Beaded edges" in Threads #172, shows you how to re-create the look of the beaded edge favored by Mariano Fortuny to accent and weight his iconic pleated dresses. Use it to embellish and finish a lightweight hem in one step by folding up or rolling the fabric edge and sewing the beads in place, or use it along the edge of a standard hem finish,as illustrated. This edging is ideal for a weighted hem.

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1. Thread a needle and knot the ends. Anchor the thread on the hem's wrong side near the folded edge, drawing the thread to the hem's right side. Take a small whipstitch over the folded edge, from the right side to the wrong side. Draw the thread to the right side again.  

 

2 Slip a bead onto the thread. Loop the thread over the folded edge and take a stitch from the wrong side, a few threads from the fold. Pass the needle through the bead again, then take another stitch from the fabric's wrong side to its right side.  

 

3 Pull the thread snugly to slightly scrunch the fabric. The bead should nestle into the dimple created. Firmer, thicker fabrics do not scrunch as easily as more pliable, thinner fabrics. Large beads may prevent a dimple.  

 

Comments (2)

LeslieD LeslieD writes: Great article Ruth. Thanks for the information. I am getting ready to do some decorative throw pillows. This just might be the thing to give them a little something extra.
Posted: 2:34 pm on March 20th

RedPointTailor RedPointTailor writes: Simple and effective!
Posted: 3:18 am on March 19th

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