Boning- Not just for Corsets - Threads

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Boning- Not just for Corsets

Sometimes a few bones in a daywear garment are indispensable; for example, for helping a seam, skirt yoke, oversized waistband, square neckline, or decorative fold stay put.
Boning can enhance everyday garments.
There and many more places to use boning: in bodices that lace up the back; in off-the-shoulder-sleeves; in wide, turned-backed cuffs; in a stand-up collar thats reluctant to behave; and in contour fabric belts and handbags.
Sometimes a few bones in a daywear garment are indispensable; for example, for helping a seam, skirt yoke, oversized waistband, square neckline, or decorative fold stay put.

Sometimes a few bones in a daywear garment are indispensable; for example, for helping a seam, skirt yoke, oversized waistband, square neckline, or decorative fold stay put.

by Susan Khalje
from Threads #87, pp. 56-59

Thinking of boning in a garment usually brings to mind a strapless gown or bustier. Everyday garments, however, don't need to be boned, because they hang from the shoulders or waist and depend on gravity to keep them looking right. But I've nonetheless found there are times when a few bones in a daywear garment are indispensable, for example, for helping a seam, skirt yoke, oversized waistband, square neckline, or decorative fold stay put. Boning in these places isn't stiff or uncomfortable (I use flexible metal boning that's lightweight and has nonpoking metal tips), and it's easy to install, with a few ground rules in mind. I'll give you some examples of places I've found boning effective, and then show you how to add it to a garment.

Sculpted folds, bodice, neckline, sideseam
Useful places for boning: Flexible spiral-steel bones keep necklines from gaping, bodices from sagging, waistbands in place, and sculpted folds from rising up.


Where to bone and why

A well-fitting garment is designed to not only look good but also assure the wearer that it isn't riding up or slipping down as she moves. For example, the fabric of a fitted skirt with a high-yoked waistband tends to ride up at the hips, choosing the path of least resistance, and moving toward the smaller waist circumference and away from the hips. At the same time, the section of waistband above the waist wants to collapse or slip down. Boning the waistband solves both problems.

Other garment areas that benefit from boning include necklines, side seams, and midriffs. Square necklines are notorious for gaping, especially when they span much of the chest. A length of boning, placed horizontally along the base of the square, keeps the edge straight and close to the body. Necklines that form a wide V often sprout drag lines along the edge, and if the garment has sleeves, arm movement intensifies the problem. But all these problems are easily fixed with small vertical sections of boning.

I also often use bones to straighten side seams on a bodice, even if the garment isn't strapless. The bones serve to counteract gravity, and keep a bodice made with a soft, drapey fabric from sagging. And if the garment happens to be a one-shoulder dress, side-seam bones will even out the tension produced by one side being supported and the other left to fend for itself.

For bodices with a V-shaped waist, bones are invaluable. Three pieces of boning radiating from the base of the V work beautifully to arbitrate the battle between the horizontal tension of the hips, and the vertical style of a nicely formed V.

For a skirt on a wedding or party dress that gathers fabric to the back- or that sculpts folds in back or front- boning sewn to an underskirt maintains the skirt's graceful folds. The wearer can move about freely without worrying that her carefully arranged folds are shifting or riding up. The draped fabric is invisibly tacked to the boning casing along the seamlines on both sides of the hips.

Ensemble Jacket waist, blouse neckline, pants waistband
Boning hidden inside these garments helps maintain their shape (photo: Sloan Howard). The jacket (Vogue 2355) has bones at the waist to support the soft, drapey fabric; the top (Burda 2964) has a horizontal bone at the base of the square neckline to keep it from gaping; and the pants' waistband, (adapted from Vogue 2355's skirt waistband) is boned to keep its high waist upright.


There are many more places to use boning: in bodices that lace up the back; in off-the-shoulder-sleeves; in wide, turned-backed cuffs; in a stand-up collar that's reluctant to behave; and in contour fabric belts and handbags. The blouse, pants, and jacket shown here use bones in the shaped waistband, around the jacket's waistline, and at the blouse's neckline to add structure to soft, drapey fabrics. When considering places for boning, keep in mind that the bones will only be effective in fitted areas close to the body, sort of like an external skeleton.

A flannel buffer
  On fabrics where the boning might show through to the right side, buffer it with a layer of flannel. Underline an entire garment section with flannel, or stitch a piece of flannel a little larger than the bone to a silk-organza underlining, as shown in this sample.

Luckily, boning can often be added after the garment is complete and you notice something sagging or puckering. Just stitch on a casing, and slip in the appropriate-sized bone.

All bones are not equal
My favorite type of boning is made from 1/4-in.-wide spiral steel. These bones are strong, yet lightweight and amazingly flexible. When properly placed, they're undetectable on the garment's right side and are comfortable to wear. You'll want to have the right size bone handy. They're sold by the piece and come in 1/2-in. increments from 1/2 in. to 17 in. (for sources, see Spiral-steel boning by mail). I usually keep a variety of sizes on hand.

When you want extremely short pieces of boning- for use in a stand-up collar, for example- it's fine to use polypropylene boning instead of spiral-steel boning, since not much strength is needed. This type of boning comes packaged in a coil; you can straighten it out with a little heat from your iron and easily cut it to length, rounding the ends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ensemble Jacket waist, blouse neckline, pants waistband
Spiral-steel bones are lightweight and strong, and flex with the body. They're available in 1/2-in.- long increments from 2 in. to 17 in. Photos: Sloan Howard.

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Comments (6)

ElvinHughes ElvinHughes writes: Actually I have bought a steampunk corset from a corset store http://www.corsets4u.com/ but now I am facing the boning problem in it. I was looking for an alternative solution for this. Now I just read your article and this idea will definitely solve my problem. Thanks for sharing such an informative post.
Posted: 1:20 am on April 4th

Jill_Lessing Jill_Lessing writes: I found this article browsing a blogger's pininterest. What a good idea for me. I have a drapey coat with a belt that is made from the same cloth. The untied belt is always twisted around when I go to tie it. So this could quite possibly be a solution. Just knowing where and how many I will need is next.
Posted: 12:55 pm on March 14th

user-2458639 user-2458639 writes: Very Useful - Thank you
Posted: 2:27 am on August 17th

Jangagtox Jangagtox writes: The quality of the inner is also very important. It should be smooth. If not your feet will be frothy.



Posted: 12:29 pm on December 1st

Sewknitcro Sewknitcro writes: This was a great article. I am making a jacket from Simplicity 4044, a retro 1940's pattern replica. It has a raised back neck that comes around to the front. The pants in this pattern has a raised waist with no waistband and the center front is rounded and split at the center front. The pattern only indicates interfacing for the waist of the pants and the front facing of the jacket but no support for the raised neckline.

The interfacing of the pant waist is insufficient and crumbles when I bend or sit.

I think the suggestion of using boning may be the solution to my delima.

Thank you Susan Khalje, you are the tops!!!!

Sandra Taylor
Posted: 9:00 pm on December 17th

Sewknitcro Sewknitcro writes: This was a great article. I am making a jacket from Simplicity 4044, a retro 1940's pattern replica. It has a raised back neck that comes around to the front. The pants in this pattern has a raised waist with no waistband and the center front is rounded and split at the center front. The pattern only indicates interfacing for the waist of the pants and the front facing of the jacket but no support for the raised neckline.

The interfacing of the pant waist is insufficient and crumbles when I bend or sit.

I think the suggestion of using boning may be the solution to my delima.

Thank you Susan Khalje, you are the tops!!!!

Sandra Taylor
Posted: 9:00 pm on December 17th

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