More Images from Louise Cutting's Sewing Room - Threads


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More Images from Louise Cutting's Sewing Room

Three vintage irons and a Clarks Mile-End cotton thread display case. Of the irons, Louise found the one with the black handle at an antiques shop, but the other two belonged to her mother.
Louises sewing space is packed with collections and fun items that reflect her interest in sewing and career as an instuctor, pattern designer, and artist.
Whimsical mannequin hands hold the curtain valances in Louises sewing room.
Three vintage irons and a Clarks Mile-End cotton thread display case. Of the irons, Louise found the one with the black handle at an antiques shop, but the other two belonged to her mother.

Three vintage irons and a Clark's Mile-End cotton thread display case. Of the irons, Louise found the one with the black handle at an antiques shop, but the other two belonged to her mother.

Photo: Gary Junken

Some of these miniature sewing machines are teapots and others are music boxes. Louise says her late husband always tried to find unusual items related to sewing for her.

Louise Cutting's sewing room   The white one is a teapot, the black one behind it is a music box, as is the one with tiny mice that turn around with fabric and lace as the music plays.

 

Louise Cutting's sewing room   In all, Louise thinks she has about 30 miniature sewing machine teapots or music boxes around her sewing studio and home.

 

Louise Cutting's sewing room   Louise is finishing two versions of her new jacket pattern, "The Director's Cut." With the pattern ready, samples sewn, pattern cover illustrations drawn, and instructions written (whew!) the pattern is ready and will be available in June 2014.

Tiny dolls line up atop the bookcases where Louise stores fabric, carefully folded and sorted by color.

Louise Cutting's sewing room   Most are Ginny dolls, a figure that predated Barbie by about 10 years. Ginny is 6 1/2 inches tall, and Louise learned to sew by making clothes for her. Louise says the Ginny doll was so popular, that the "Big 4" pattern companies had patterns for her.

Louise points out that if you examine the doll's purchased garments, they had hand-sewn snaps and buttons and 1-inch zippers! There are also few Madame Alexander dolls (you weren't allowed to play with them) and a Muffy doll (a Ginny knock-off) and Jill, Ginny's big sister. Jill is a much more realistic version of a teenager than Barbie, Louise says. All of her dolls are collector's items. 

See more images on next page.

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Comments (1)

dsantil71 dsantil71 writes: Only 2 pictures showed the actual room, all the other pictures were close up shots of items in the room. The article mainly talked about the items used to decorate room and nothing seem to discuss about the actual function of the room. For once I am disappointed in an article in Threads, unfortunately.
Posted: 10:10 pm on November 18th

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